Wyoming Experiment Station
Search

Active Research

This database shows all of the research that is supported by the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station. Research is funded with capacity funds received from NIFA plus a variety of other sources. The majority of the projects are conducted at the Research and Extension Centers.

The NIFA project titles are linked to the project details on the USDA Information System website. The Field Day Bulletin titles are linked to 2-page articles. The objectives for each project can be found by clicking the "Read More" button. For questions and follow-up information, email the project director by clicking on their name.

Project Title
2014 Dry Bean Performance Evaluation
Project Director:  M. Moore
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII:1  
2014 Dryland Cool Season Grass Variety Trial
Project Director:  Roger Hybner
Department: Other
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
2014 National Winter Canola Variety Trial
Project Director:  J. Nachtman
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2014 Proso Millet Variety Trial Nursery: Dryland
Project Director:  J. Nachtman
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2014 Spring Barley Variety Performance Evaluation
Project Director:  A. Pierson
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2014 Winter Wheat Variety Trial Nurseries: Eastern Wyoming Dryland
Project Director:  J. Nachtman
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2014 Winter Wheat Variety Trial Nursery: Goshen County Dryland
Project Director:  J. Nachtman
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2014_MI21: Cover crop mixtures.
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
2014_PB02: Dicamba Rotational Crop Safety
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
2015 Briess Variety Performance Evaluation
Project Director:  A. Pierson
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2015 Dry Bean Performance Evaluation-Market Class Data
Project Director:  M. Moore
Year: 2016
Department: Seed Certification
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   II  
2015 Dry Bean Performance Evaluation-Pinto Bean and Slow-Darkening Pinto Bean
Project Director:  M. Moore
Year: 2016
Department: Seed Certification
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   II  
2015 Elite Malt Barley Variety Performance Evaluation
Project Director:  A. Pierson
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
2015_NIFA_SAREC: Effect of herbicide, crop rotation, and tillage on ALS-resistant kochia
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
6|2014 Field Days BulletinEffect of Irrigation and Nitrogen Application on Yield of Corn for Silage
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
A 20-year Retrospective Evaluation of Seeding Competitive Perennial Grasses for Dalmatian Toadflax Suppression
Project Director:  B. Fowers
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5  
A comparison of foliar band treatments for season-long Rhizoctonia control in the Bighorn Basin sugarbeet production area
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
A Comparison of Foliar-Banded Fungicide Treatments for the Management of Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugarbeet
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
A modular curriculum to teach critical concepts in organic agriculture across regions
Project Director:  Randa Jabbour
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

ObjectivesCharacterize instructors' mental models for organic agriculture education.Develop introductory curriculum to address critical concepts identified by instructors.Test curriculum in target classes across regions, accounting for student perceptions.

A Novel Arsenic Filter for Field Applications
Project Director:  Katta Reddy
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Groundwater is an important drinking water resource for many rural communities. These small communities are at high risk for potential arsenic related health problems due to a lack of water treatment facilities. Natural processes and anthropogenic activities can mobilize arsenic in groundwater. The natural processes include weathering of aquifer minerals. Anthropogenic activities include energy production. The main theme of the proposed research is to develop a novel and effective one-step arsenic filter for field applications. If successful, the proposed research will results in an inexpensive arsenic removal technology for small communities and for produced water resulting from energy activities. Another important aspect of the proposed research is recruiting a graduate student who will be an integral part of the project. Earlier laboratory batch CuO-As experiments provide valuable information about reaction kinetics and effectiveness of CuO treatment in removal of As under different water chemistries. However, further studies are required to develop As filter for field applications. Also, information about regeneration of CuO particles and their effectiveness in removal of As from natural waters is required. To accomplish these goals we propose to develop a flow-through reactor using CuO nanoparticles and test As removal both under laboratory and field conditions. The objectives of this research will be to 1) design and implement a flow-through column to be used for in field, slip-stream filtration of arsenic, 2) demonstrate the effectiveness of arsenic removal by CuO in a wide range of water chemistries, 3) establish the effectiveness of a one-step regeneration and reuse of the CuO nanoparticles, 4) isolate, harvest and characterize the arsenic from the removal process, and 5) examine the effect of the flow-through arsenic filtration column on water quality. These research findings should significantly improve the health of many people by improving water quality.

A Novel Method for Removing Cheatgrass from Reclamation Seed
Project Director:  W. Rose
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:5,   XII:1  
AAS Display Garden
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Advancing Landowner Tools for Use with the Greater-Sage Grouse Umbrella Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances (CCAA) for Wyoming Ranch Management
Project Director:  John "Derek" Scasta
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The Advancing Landowner Tools for Use with the Greater-Sage Grouse Umbrella Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances (CCAA) for Wyoming Ranch Management Agriculture Producer Research Grant Program (APRGP) project goals are to:1. Foster success in using the Greater Sage-Grouse Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances for Wyoming Ranch Management as a risk management tool.2. Provide additional greater sage-grouse conservation tools and resources for private landowners and managers in Wyoming.

AECL 1000 Collection
Project Director:  Randa Jabbour
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Alfalfa Growth Forms, Light Capture, and Nitrogen Fixation Interact to Influence Durability of Legume in Meadow Bromegrass Mixtures
Project Director:  D. S. Ashilenje
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2   VII  
Alfalfa Variety Yield and S and B Trials
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
All-America Selections' annual and perennial flowers
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
All-America Selections’ Vegetables and Herbs
Project Director:  K. Panter
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Alleviating cold damage in vineyards
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Alleviating grapevine cold damage in Wyoming vineyards
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Year: 2015
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
alternate-row grass/alfalfa trial
Project Director:  Roger Hybner
Department: Other
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
An Experiment to Re-Establish Ponderosa Pine after Fire at the Rogers Research Site
Project Director:  S.E. Williams
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   X:1, 2,   XI:1  
Analysis for Reclamation Costs in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin
Project Director:  A. Perry
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   IX   XII:1  
Animal-Plant Interaction Ecology on Wyoming Rangelands
Project Director:  John "Derek" Scasta
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Wyoming is dominated by rangelands that are critical for livestock production and the conservation of natural resources. The provision of ecosystem services from Wyoming's rangelands has led to concern by the general public about endangered species, increasing litigation, management of wild horses, changing policies regarding water resources, and potential deleterious effects of climate variation. These concerns have also further complicated the many challenges to livestock production including animal distribution, parasitism, drought, fire, forage quality and quantity, and competition with wild and feral wildlife. This research program will focus on critical ecological interactions between grazing animals and plant communities in Wyoming within the context of social interests and livelihoods.Specific Goals Include:1. Address the most challenging issues affecting livestock production and the conservation of natural resources within the context of animal-plant interactions in Wyoming. Determine rangeland monitoring techniques to evaluate associated conflicts.2. Understand how disturbances such as drought and fire affect plant communities and distribution of livestock and wildlife to develop innovative strategies for coping with wildfire. Assist managers in making best management decisions to respond to these disturbances and strategically apply prescribed fire as a management tool.3. Determine adaptive grazing management strategies that are beneficial ecologically, agriculturally, and socially while looking out for the best interests of livelihoods and natural resources.4. Understand the complexity of livestock and wildlife parasites as it relates to topography, climate, vegetation structure, and animal movements in Wyoming.5. Develop impartial data about how wild horses move through landscapes, affect plant communities, and interact with wildlife and livestock.Areas of focus to address these goals include:1. Rangeland Vegetation Monitoring2. Drought and Climate Variation3. Wildfire and Prescribed Burning4. Livestock Production Under Harsh Range Conditions5. Parasites and Diseases of Livestock and Wildlife6. Wild Horse Management

annotation of shade loci
Project Director:  Cynthia Weinig
Department: Botany
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Antioxidant activity characterization of food and crop plants
Project Director:  Rhoda Schantz
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Characterize the antioxidants and antioxidant capacity in legumes, wheat, barley, and fruits such as grapes and non-grape fruits such as chokecherries (all to be Wyoming grown).Characterize the antioxidants and their antioxidant capacity in pre-historic food.

Appendix - Wyoming Production Agriculture Research Priorities (PARP)
Project Director:  D. Zalesky
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Assessment of alfalfa pest management challenges and strategies across Wyoming: responding to farmer priorities and engaging students in the land-grant mission
Project Director:  Randa Jabbour
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1. Define farmer perceptions, priorities, and decision-making strategies regarding pest management in alfalfa, including those producing hay, seed, or on-farm feed.2. Quantify connectivity and importance of farmer-farmer advice and other relationships using social network analysis.3. Engage students through novel curriculum based on farmer decision-making.4. Communicate findings through Extension and peer-reviewed publications and seek funding to develop a multi-state, externally funded research program in alfalfa pest management.

Assessment of Alfalfa Pest Management Challenges in Wyoming
Project Director:  R. Jabbour
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   X:2  
Assessment of Alfalfa Pest Management Challenges in Wyoming
Project Director:  R. Jabbour
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   X:2  
Bacterial Blight of Pinto Bean Control with GWN-10073
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Barle Production
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Barley Production
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Barley Production
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Barley Production
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Bean Production
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Beneficial Flowering Plants
Project Director:  Randa Jabbour
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Benefits and Costs of Natural Resources Policies Affecting Ecosystem Services on Public and Private Lands
Project Director:  Donald McLeod
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Best Cover Crop and Tillage Management Strategies for Dryland Winter-Wheat Cropping Systems in Northern High Plains
Project Director:  Urszula Norton
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The Central High Plains have been largely left out of the "Soil Health Movement" because many of the central principles are not viewed as effective where fallow periods are perceived as necessary for moisture conservation. Dryland agriculture is very important to livelihoods in this region despite the resource-limited and challenging environment. Projections of increased recurrence of drought caused by variable precipitation and extreme winds during fall and early spring mean that the future of agricultural production may be even more challenging. Winter wheat is the primary cash crop even though typical yields are only 20 to 35 bushels per acre. Low biomass yields mean that no-till is not as effective at moisture conservation or SOM accumulation as in other regions, and few farmers practice reduced tillage. A few producers do successfully use no- or reduced-tillage practices, however, and some use cover crops on an opportunistic basis. But the few published research articles suggest that using cover crops in this region negatively impacts crop yields due to competition for water. It is unknown how synergistic effects of reducing tillage and planting cover crops will work in this region and whether one or the other practice should be most recommended.Major Goal: Evaluate whether cover crops, reduction of tillage or a combination of both can be viable practices for dryland crop rotations in the Central High Plains in order to improve soil quality and soil health.Specific objectives:Evaluate integrated cover crops/tillage scenarios on crop yields;Evaluate their effects on soil properties and processes that indicate soil quality, soil moisture, insect populations, and weed competition;Disseminate results to local, regional, and national audiences.Economic analyses are not included but all costs and revenues will be recorded and if these alternative cropping systems show promise a partial budget analysis will be performed.

Betaseed Variety Trial
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Animal Science
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Biological Control in Pest Management Systems of Plants
Project Director:  Timothy Collier
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Biological versus mechanical tillage for hayfield improvement
Project Director:  Daniel Smith
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:7,   II:6  
Bird's-foot Trefoil Response to Planting Method and Harvesting Frequency
Project Director:  S. Sarkar
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2, 7,   II:8,   III:2  
Birdsfoot trefoil study
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Breeding Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) for Resistance to Abiotic and Biotic Stresses, Sustainable Production, and Enhanced Nutritional Value
Project Director:  James Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Briess VPT
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Animal Science
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Broadleaf weed control barley 2015
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Broadleaf weed control in barley
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:1, 7  
Broadleaf Weed Control in Barley
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:1, 7  
Camelina feedstock viability
Project Director:  Thomas Foulke
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Carrot and Corn salad flowering study
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Cheatgrass Challenge
Project Director:  Brian Mealor
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Cheatgrass Grazing
Project Director:  Brian Mealor
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Circ clock and performance
Project Director:  Cynthia Weinig
Department: Botany
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Clues to Successful Community Development in Wyoming
Project Director:  Duane Williams
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

In general, the study will strive to understand, from a sociological perspective, why some communities are better able to address challenges and opportunities? The study will evaluate social theory on community organization and change. Special attention will be given to the social impact of development. This research project is especially interested in public programs (state, county and municipal) which utilize local civic engagement in their program design, development and implementation. Although there is a wide variety of use of the term community coalition, this study will focus on collective action of coalitions which have a public program component, such as, behavioral health activities (county substance abuse prevention, suicide prevention, wellness promotion, social services, etc.) and community development activities (economic development, housing, social services, etc.).Major Goal: To uncover the common process and environmental characteristics of successful community civic engagement and coalition development activities.Specific Objectives 1. Build a community-based participatory collaboration with key individual community leaders and program stakeholders. a. Obtain feedback to identify potential community organizations and coalitions.2. Build a community-based participatory collaboration with specific community organizations and coalitions. a. Identify successful civic engagement and/or development actions.3. Conduct community case studies to determine characteristics of successful civic engagement/development efforts. a. Individual interviews and focus group sessions to collect data on community success in civic engagement/development efforts.

Comparison of Brucella ovis seroprevalence in Wyoming domestic sheep flocks using two different diagnostic ELISA tests.
Project Director:  Kerry Sondgeroth
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Brucella ovis has direct negative effects on lamb production, and is of major concern for Wyoming producers as lamb production accounts for 35% of gross agricultural sales (2012, University of Wyoming Extension). Brucella ovis (B. ovis) is a, gram negative bacterial pathogen that is present in most major sheep-producing regions of the world. Infection is introduced into a flock through an infected ram, and historically is associated with epididymitis. However, less than half of infected rams have palpable clinical abnormalities of the epididymis. The implications of a B.ovis infection for the flock include: ram infertility, decreased ewe conception rates, more abortions in pregnant ewes, and higher numbers of premature lambs. The effect of B.ovis infection is not only economic, as valuable genetics are also lost when infected rams are culled from the flock. Infection spreads throughout a flock of sheep by direct contact between rams, but can also be transmitted through the ewe when multiple rams mate with the same ewe during the breeding season. Serology can be used to detect exposure to B.ovis, and for Wyoming producers with larger flocks (>50 ewes) it is used as part of the breeding soundness exam. While ewes are not typically tested, there is evidence that they can harbor the bacteria for multiple estrus cycles and be a source of ram re-infection. Additionally, some infected rams do not develop antibodies, and by testing ewes an infected but sero-negative ram would be identified. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is utilized by most veterinary diagnostic labs that test for this bacteria. There are multiple reasons to use this assay; consistent results, easily train personnel, fast turnarounds, and low cost. There are also a few drawbacks such as laboratory to laboratory variability, and the classification of samples as Indeterminate (not quite positive and not quite negative). This is extremely frustrating from the producers' perspective. How do they determine the actual infection status when one laboratory indicates the animal is Positive and another indicates Negative? And what does a producer do with an "Indeterminate" result? Is it worth the risk to the flock to introduce an "Indeterminate" ram into the flock?The seroprevalence of B. ovis has not been well documented in the United States, and a basic study concerning seroprevalence would be useful to better understand factors associated with its prevalence.The objective

Comparitive efficacy of avalable Rhizoctonia fungicides in Sugar beet
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Compost Carryover and Cover Crop
Project Director:  Jay Norton
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Compost carryover and cover crop effects on soil quality, profitability, and cultivar selection in organic dryland wheat
Project Director:  Jay Norton
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I   II   VII   IX   X  
Consequences of weed biocontrol for weed-native plant interactions
Project Director:  Timothy Collier
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Cool-Season Grass Response to Irrigation, Drought, and Planting Time
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Cooperative Dry Bean Nursery
Project Director:  Mike Moore
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Crop Response to Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilizer in Sugarbeet/Bean/Barley Rotations under Conservation Tillage and Limited Irrigation
Project Director:  J.B. Norton
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I   II   VII   IX  
Cut Flower and Herb Yields in Wyoming Greenhouses and High Tunnels
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Deep-pot cottonwoods for riparian restoration
Project Director:  Brian A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   IX:4,   X:3,   XII:1  
Deficit Irrigation Possible in Confection Sunflower Production in Northwest Wyoming
Project Director:  V.R. Joshi
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   IV:4  
Detection and elimination of listerial exopolysaccharide
Project Director:  Mark Gomelsky
Department: Molecular Biology
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The Gomelsky and Miller laboratories have recently discovered that Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis, synthesizes a novel EPS. This EPS coats bacterial aggregates and significantly enhances listerial resistance to desiccation (dehydration) and disinfectants used in the food industry (Chen et al., 2014). At present, we don't know how prevalent the listerial EPS is in food-processing facilities and what role it plays in listerial survival. To address these questions, we intend to develop a method for listerial EPS detection and apply it to samples from listeria-contaminated facilities and from contaminated fresh produce (where EPS presence is expected). Because the likelihood that EPS enhances listerial survival in food processing facilities is high, we also plan to develop the means to degrade this EPS and prevent its formation de novo. We have identified, characterized and patented an enzyme, glycosylhydrolase PssZ from L. monocytogenes, which hydrolyzes listerial EPS. When purified PssZ protein is added to listerial cultures, it disperses pre-formed EPS-based aggregates (biofilms) and prevents new EPS formation, which makes bacteria vulnerable to disinfectants and desiccation (Köseoglu et al., 2015). For potential industrial applications, in the future we intend to identify PssZ analogs (homologs) with properties that are more compatible with sanitation solutions and/or produce washing solutions, than the properties of listerial PssZ. The Objective of this project is to develop a listerial EPS detection probe and begin determining the presence of EPS in food processing facilities with listerial contamination.

Detection, management, and prioritization of invasive plant species in rangeland systems
Project Director:  Daniel Tekiela
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Determining the effects of climate variables and maternal antibody on the natural transmission of bluetongue virus in range pastured beef cattle
Project Director:  Myrna Miller
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goals and Objectives.Major Goals. Our goals are to better understand the dynamics of natural BTV transmission, how maternal antibody protection impacts this process, and identify correlated meteorological conditions. This information is needed to understand the current epidemiology of BT disease, better predict outbreaks, identify likely impacts of a warmer climate, and will help livestock owners make informed decisions on vaccination or other potential prevention strategies. Another valuable product of this research will be to isolate and identify the current BTV serotypes circulating in eastern Wyoming, information needed to recognize when new strains move into the state.Objectives.Identify climate variables correlated with the onset and intensity of BTV infection in beef cattle managed under range conditions, as well as vector prevalence.Determine the effect of maternal antibodies on time of onset of seroconversion to BTV in the first summer of spring born calves.Characterize the strains of BTV circulating at the study site during each of the three seasons of this study.

Determining the Effects of Climate Variables and Maternal Antibody on the Natural Transmission of Bluetongue Virus in Range-Pastured Beef Cattle
Project Director:  M. Miller
Year: 2016
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:6,   X:1  
Developing Strategies to Improve Reclamation Success of Drastically Disturbed Lands
Project Director:  
Year: 2015
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:2, 5,   XII:1  
Development and validation of a Polymerase Chain Reaction test for diagnosis of Brucella abortus infections in livestock in Wyoming
Project Director:  Brant Schumaker
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The major goal of this project is to develop, validate and implement a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) test for Brucella abortus. It is our central hypothesis that the development of a PCR diagnostic test will have increased sensitivity over culture. We have defined three specific objectives:Using Brucella abortus isolates from domestic livestock, test validity of proposed DNA primers.Optimize DNA extraction and purification, primer composition, reaction conditions, and reagent mixture.Perform bench and field validation of the PCR assay.

Development of a new test for diagnosis of livestock brucellosis
Project Director:  Brant Schumaker
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Development of biological property rubrics, including symbiotic associations and nitrogen cycling, to supplement soil surveys.
Project Director:  Stephen Williams
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The overall focus of this effort is to bring the Rogers Research Site (RRS), forested largely by ponderosa pine and lodge pole pine, into the array of research stations and sites managed by the University of Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station. This will require considerable construction of infrastructure and basic information collection and display. To this end our objectives are (1) Establish a climate database at RRS. (2a) Conduct an edaphic survey(parameters focused on plant growth as related to soil characteristics) at the RRS. This will include mapping of the soils and vegetation at the RRS as well as identification of nitrogen fixing species and a general identification ofmycorrhizal fungi (ectomycorrhizal organisms and arbuscular mycorrhizal organisms ) and their host plants at the RRS. (2b) The edaphic survey will include excavation of key soil profiles across the RRS, identification of pedogenic horizons as well as chemical and physical properties. (3) Determine via N15/N14 natural abundance the putative rates of nitrogen fixation in order to project a nitrogen budget for the RRS. Expected outcomes will include an interactive soils, vegetation, topographic, climatic and geological map(s) of the RRS and adjacent (Medicine Bow National Forest) lands. Fundamental information pertaining to genetic based identification of soil organisms via morphological identification as well as chemical (phospholipid and DNA markers) should provide the basis for at least one master thesis.

Development of Genetic Resources and Management Practices for Sustainable Grapevine Production in Wyoming
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Objectives for the project include:1) identify grapevine cultivars that exhibit rapid growth and establishment in specific soils and locations;2) analyze differential gene expression patterns of drought and salinity stressed grapevines to identify genes involved in stress tolerance;3) incorporate abiotic stress tolerance genes in target cultivars and rootstocks using genetic engineering.

Diet, exercise and lifestyle on health, disease prevention and physical performance in Wyoming Residents
Project Director:  Enette Larson-Meyer
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major GoalExplore the genetic and physiological basis of Brisket disease and the relationships to cattle production.Objectives1. Develop a physical phenotype for animals in the Laramie Research & Extension Center Center cattle herd including physical screening for clinical signs of Brisket disease and identification of underperforming cattle.2. Correlate hemodynamic parameters (via PAP testing) with physical phenotype.3. Screen Bos germplasm for genetic resistance to high altitude disease.

Disease and pest management in irrigated small grains
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Disease management in sugar beets
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Disease management in sugar beets
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Diversity and Adaptation
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Diversity and Adaptation
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Does Dalmatian toadflax alter soil microbe communities to the detriment of a native rangeland grass?
Project Director:  Timothy Collier
Year: 2016
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5  
Does Dalmatian toadflax alter soil microbe communities to the detriment of native rangeland plants?
Project Director:  Timothy Collier
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5  
Drought Susceptibility Index and Canopy Traits of 49 Dry Bean Genotypes Subjected to Water Stress
Project Director:  J. Heitholt
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Dryland cover crop and rotations
Project Director:  NRCS
Department: Other
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Early Blight Management in Potato with Luna Tranquility
Project Director:  W. Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Ecological relations and management of selected rangeland plants
Project Director:  J. Daniel Rodgers
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1. Determine plant composition, forage production responses, and resultant threshold sagebrush abundances following manipulation of different abundances of Wyoming big sagebrush (A. tridentata var. Wyomingensis) with emphasis on long term responses. 2. Determine the influence of anticedent environmental conditions on the annual response of sagebrush plant communities with and without manipulation. 3. Determine the economic threshold abundance of sagebrush justifying control.

Ecological Restoration, Seed Sourcing and Climate Change
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The major goals of this project are to investigate and define the features of adaptive differentiation in native plant species that are critical for restoration success.Objectives:1. Increase opportunities for vegetation establishment by exploiting natural traits that improve soil quality, lower reclamation costs, and increase the likelihood of plant community recovery;2. Test adaptive differentiation in light of exotic species invasions;3. Test adaptive differentiation in light of changing climates.

Economic benefits and costs of vaccinating domestic sheep against bluetongue virus in Wyoming
Project Director:  Dannele Peck
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The primary goal of our proposed study is to develop and distribute economic information and a decision-tool that sheep producers in Wyoming and surrounding states can use to decide whether it makes economic sense to adopt a BTV-17 vaccine.A secondary goal of our proposed study is to provide economic information which sheep associations and animal health experts can use to decide whether it would make economic sense to stockpile a BTV-17 vaccine that Wyoming producers could quickly access at the first sign of a regional outbreak.Objectives for achieving our goals are as follows:1) Recruit a highly-qualified student into the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics' masters program to work on the proposed study for their thesis research;2) Revise existing sheep budgets (Gardiner 2011), with input from our producer partner, to represent one farm-flock and three range-flocks of various sizes;3) Estimate the cost of a BT outbreak for our four representative sheep operations; 4) Estimate the cost of administering a custom-ordered BTV-17 vaccine on the four operations;5) Determine for each of the four sheep operations how costly and/or frequent a BT outbreak would have to be to justify investing in a BTV-17 vaccine;6) Present research results to sheep producers in Wyoming and surrounding states via a producer-led presentation at the Tri-State Wool Growers Convention, to obtain stakeholder feedback and answer questions about BT disease and procurement of a BTV-17 vaccine;7) Develop an Extension bulletin that presents our economic budgets, cost estimates, and benefit estimates in a manner that producers can easily revise to reflect their operations' unique characteristics, costs and benefits.

Economic Impacts of Variable Precipitation on Wyoming Rancherss
Project Director:  T. Hamilton
Year: 2015
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VI:1,   VII:6,   X:1  
Economics of Vaccinating Sheep against Bluetongue Disease
Project Director:  D. Peck
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:3, 7  
Effect of Forage Kochia on Growth of Native Grass Seedlings
Project Director:  P. Aryal
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VI:4, 8,   XII:1  
Effect of frame score and extended grazing on steer performance and system economics
Project Director:  Steve Paisley
Department: Animal Science
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Effect of Irrigation and Nitrogen Rates on Yield of Corn for Silage
Project Director:  A. Nilahyane
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2,   IV:3, 4  
Effect of Irrigation on Physiological Traits of Corn for Silage Grown under On-Surface Drip-Irrigation System
Project Director:  A. Nilahyane
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   IV:1, 3, 4  
Effect of Phosphorus on Sainfoin
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Effect of planting time and fertilizer management on quinoa
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Effect of planting time and fertilizer management on quinoa production in Wyoming
Project Director:  Anowarul M. Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The specific objectives of the proposal are to:1) Improve local knowledge of an increasingly in demand crop, quinoa;2) Learn whether this crop can be grown to its full potential in Wyoming's environments;3) Develop best management and production practices and strategies for adaptation and production in Wyoming.

Effect of Soil Nitrogen Rate on Leaf Chlorophyll and Vegetative Growth of Dry Bean
Project Director:  A. Alhasan
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Effect of Two Nitrogen Levels and Cultivars on Growth Traits of Nine Dry Bean Cultivars in the Field
Project Director:  A. Alhasan
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Effects of Drought on Cow-Calf Production at Two UW Research Stations from 2011
Project Director:  J.D. Scasta
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   V:5, 7,   VI:3,   X:1, 2  
Effects of Feed Efficiency Ranking and Indexing on Reproductive Performance in Growing Beef Heifers
Project Director:  S.L. Lake
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1, 4, 7, 8  
Effects of Limited irrigation on herbicide efficacy and herbicide carry over
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Determine the impact of limited irrigation on efficacy of soil-applied herbicides that are commonly used in corn and dry-bean production.Limited irrigation may reduce weed control from soil-applied herbicides early in the season, which may increase reliance on post emergence herbicide use.By reducing microbial breakdown, limited irrigation may increase late-season herbicide availability, improving late-season weed control.Determine the impact of limited irrigation on herbicide dissipation in the soil and potential carryover to rotational crops.By reducing microbial breakdown of the herbicide, limited irrigation may result in increased availability of the herbicide the following year, causing potential yield loss in rotational crops.It is possible that a fall soil bioassay may predict crop yield loss potential or the following spring under limited irrigation conditions.

Effects of limited irrigation on herbicide efficacy and herbicide carry over
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Effects of limited irrigation on herbicide efficacy and herbicide carryover
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:4, 7,   X:1  
Effects of Limited Irrigation on Herbicide Efficacy and Herbicide Carryover
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:4, 7,   X:1  
Effects of nitrogen application rates on seed size and oil quality
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Effects of nitrogen application rates on seed size and oil quality on sunflower
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Effects of nitrogen application rates on sunflower seed size and oil quality
Project Director:  Austen Samet
Year: 2015
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2, 4  
Efficacy and economics of cultural and mechanical weed control practices for herbicide resistant weed management.
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Our long-term goal is to understand the impact of non-herbicidal weed control practices on development of herbicide-resistant weed populations in order to develop sustainable cropping systems that prolong the utility of existing herbicide resources. In order to accomplish our long-term goal, we propose the following specific objectives for this research project: 1. Determine the impact of crop rotation diversity and tillage on enrichment of an herbicide resistance trait within a weed population. 2. Quantify the economic benefits and risks of adopting a diversified weed management program to delay the development of herbicide resistance. 3. Evaluate the fitness of the most common mutation that confers resistance to acetolactate-synthase (ALS)-inhibiting herbicides in Kochia scoparia (Trp574) under field conditions.

Efficacy and economics of cultural and mechanical weed control practices for herbicide-resistant weed management
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Year: 2015
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:3, 7, 9,   III:1, 7,   VII:4, 7,   VIII:2,   IX:1  
EFNEP Related Research, Program Evaluation and Outreach
Project Director:  Mary Kay Wardlaw
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Elder Financial Exploitation: Impact on Families
Project Director:  Virginia Vincenti
Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Elite Malt Barley Trial
Project Director:  Andi Pierson
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Elite Malt Barley Trial
Project Director:  Andi Pierson
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Energy and Natural Resource Development Impacts on Rural Economies: Trade-offs Between Market Production and Ecosystem Services
Project Director:  Thomas Foulke
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The major goal of this project is to develop and disseminate models and analytical tools to help decision-makers, researchers and the general public better understand the trade-offs encountered with theenergy development issues that they face.Specific objectives to achieve this goal include:1. Conduct economic analyses to understand the trade-offs between specific development projects and the ecosystems services provided by alternative land uses, such as agriculture and/or conservation initiatives.2. Investigate the economic impact of changes in land use (such as energy development or the conversion of agricultural lands) on endangered species and how development might have broader implications (both geographic and temporal).3. Analyze the role of expanding predation by large predators on the existing ranching system in the state and try to understand and anticipate how changes will impact agricultural producers and offer alternative production possibilities.4. Develop methods to estimate conservation easement values on agricultural lands, and use the values to analyze the economic and ecological efficiency of alternative targeting strategies for mitigating energy development impacts on wildlife.5. Develop an information tool (e.g., GIS map suite) to help federal land managers understand the economic and ecological tradeoffs (e.g., costs and ecological return) of alternative management activities for protecting sage-grouse.

Engineering alfalfa weevil resistance in commercial alfalfa cultivars: A valuable tool for integrated pest management
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Engineering alfalfa weevil resistance in commercial alfalfa cultivars: a valuable tool for integrated pest management of alfalfa weevil
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The purpose of the proposed project is to incorporate insect (alfalfa weevil) resistance in commercial alfalfa cultivars using genetic engineering technology, thus generating new germplasm not currently available and overcoming a major limiting factor in alfalfa production.Specific objectives include:1) Targeted expression of Galanthus nivalis (snow drop) lectin genes in transgenic alfalfa cultivars,2) Greenhouse screening of transgenic plants for enhanced resistance against alfalfa weevil, and3) Determining yield potential and forage quality of the screened transgenic alfalfa plants.

Enhancement of sustainability and profitability of sheep enterprises in Wyoming and the sheep producing western states.
Project Director:  Brenda Alexander
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The overall goal of this project is to add to the knowledge base of sheep production efficiency and develop tools that if adopted by producers will increase efficiency and therefore, the sustainability of the sheep industry.This project encompasses many different objectives which will are necessary to fulfill the overall objective.Determine relationships between RFI and other traits of economic importance in sheepDetermine potential selection tools to improve feed efficiency in sheepDetermine the neural basis for sexual inactivity in ramsIncreasing lambing rate and productivity by altering selection of ewe lamb replacements

Enhancing management, production, and sustainability of grazing ruminants in extensive landscapes
Project Director:  Anowarul M. Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Enhancing Microbial Food Safety by Risk Analysis
Project Director:  Bledar Bisha
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Enteric Diseases of Food Animals: Enhanced Prevention, Control and Food Safety
Project Director:  Bledar Bisha
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Evaluate sugarbeet seed treatments under field conditions
Project Director:  Andrea Pierson
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   IX:4  
Evaluating alfalfa and sainfoin under dryland conditions
Project Director:  Daniel Smith
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I   II:9  
Evaluating chronic herbicide exposure for long-term reduction of Canada thistle
Project Director:  Brian A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5, 7,   VI:3,   XII:1  
Evaluating Crop Safety of Herbicides Applied Preplant in Sugarbeet
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:1, 7  
Evaluating Direct Herbicide Impacts on Desirable Species Used in Reclamation
Project Director:  B. Fowers
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:2,   XII:1  
Evaluating foxtail barley management options
Project Director:  Brian A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5, 7,   VI:3  
Evaluating herbicide mixtures and seeding of cheatgrass-dominated sites
Project Director:  Brian A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5, 7,   VI:3,   XII:1  
Evaluating Multi-Species Targeted Grazing for Cheatgrass Control
Project Director:  C.E. Noseworthy
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:5,   VI:4, 5,   XII:1  
Evaluating new herbicide mixtures for rangeland cheatgrass management
Project Director:  Brian A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5, 7,   VI:3,   XII:1  
Evaluating soil amendment MB906 with and without imazapic for cheatgrass control
Project Director:  Brian A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5, 7,   VI:3,   XII:1  
Evaluating table and wine grape cultivars in high tunnels for yield and quality improvement
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Evaluating the Efficacy of Two Imazapic Formulations and Sagebrush Canopy Effects on Cheatgrass Control under Greenhouse Conditions
Project Director:  C. W. Wood
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:5, 7,   VI:3,   XII:1  
Evaluating the influence of climate change on the commingling of livestock and wild ungulates: quantifying the risks across Wyoming rangelan
Project Director:  Jerod Merkle
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The major goal is to develop a framework for understanding the ecology of wildlife-livestock commingling, particularly with regard to landscape-level changes in plant phenology that climate change will bring. The project has the following three goals.Objective 1. Examine how changes in plant phenology influence elk and bighorn sheep seasonal habitat use in areas that overlap with livestock. Specifically, I will develop habitat selection models to test and refine the link between plant phenology and animal movement.Objective 2. Characterize the spatio-temporal distribution of cattle and sheep by determining how range managers move livestock across seasonal grazing allotments. Specifically, I will compile past grazing records on public and private lands and develop a spatially-explicit temporal landscape prediction of livestock distribution.Objective 3. Develop predictions of how climate change is likely to influence the present and future distribution of commingling hotspots. In this final step, I will use projections of phenological alterations caused by climate change to predict the distribution of both livestock and wild ungulates, and where they commingle. Commingling hotspots will be evaluated from the perspective of B. abortus transmission from elk to cattle, Pasteurella spp. transmission from domestic to bighorn sheep, and elk-cattle commingling in areas occupied by wolves and grizzly bears.

Evaluating the use of thresholds' concepts for improving habitat through cheatgrass management
Project Director:  Clay Wood
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:5, 7,   VI:3,   XII:1  
Evaluating variable-rate irrigation system at SAREC
Project Director:  Brian Lee
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   IV:4,   VII:4, 7  
Evaluating wildlife population response to habitat conditions in Wyoming's forests and rangelands
Project Director:  Jeff Beck
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

I. Greater sage-grouse response to energy development: Objective Ia. Identify breeding season habitats for sage-grouse population persistence within a developing coalbed natural gas field. Objective Ib. Identify winter habitats for sage-grouse population persistence within a developing coalbed natural gas field. Objective Ic. Evaluate sage-grouse reproductive habitat response to wind energy development. Objective Id. Identify male lek attendance patterns in relation to wind energy development. Objective Ie. Evaluate sage-grouse demographic and habitat selection response to bentonite mining. Expected Outputs - training graduate students; presentation of findings at symposia and conferences; and dissemination of results through published journal articles. II. Greater sage-grouse response to habitat enhancement treatments: Objective IIa. To compare insect community abundance and diversity between prescribed burned and mowed Wyoming big sagebrush. Objective IIb. To evaluate the demographic response of sage-grouse to habitat enhancement treatments in big sagebrush communities. Expected Outputs - training graduate students; presentation of findings at symposia and conferences; and dissemination of results through published journal articles. III. Ungulate response to disturbance rish: Objective IIIa. To identify mechanisms that lead to elk avoidance of energy-field infrastructure. Objective IIIb. To evaluate elk and pronghorn displacement on crucial winter range that has been developed for wind energy resources. Objective IIIc. To evaluate pronghorn response to fence modification in natural gas development fields Expected Outputs - training graduate students; presentation of findings at symposia and conferences; and dissemination of results through published journal articles.

Evaluation of Birdsfoot Trefoil, a Non-bloating Forage Legume, in Wyoming
Project Director:  Anowarul M. Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major goal:Evaluate birdsfoot trefoil to fill the knowledge gap for Wyoming on this important forage legume crop.Specific objectives: 1. Determine if the crop can be grown to its full potential in Wyoming environments.2. Develop best establishment, management, and production practices for producers.

Evaluation of elite malting barley varieties
Project Director:  Andrea Pierson
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII:1  
Evaluation of Forage Productivity and Environmental Benefits of Meadow Bromegrass in Various Mixtures with Popular Legumes under Irrigation
Project Director:  D. S. Ashilenje
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2   VII  
Evaluation of goji berry as a high-value fruit crop for Wyoming
Project Director:  Jeremiah Vardiman
Department: UW Extension
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Evaluation of goji berry as a high-value fruit crop for Wyoming
Project Director:  Jeremiah Vardiman
Department: UW Extension
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Evaluation of goji berry as a high-value fruit crop in Wyoming
Project Director:  Jeremiah Vardiman
Year: 2016
Department: UW Extension
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Evaluation of grape varieties and roostocks
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Evaluation of Quinoa and Fenugreek in Wyoming Conditions
Project Director:  S. Baskota
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2,   VI:1, 8  
Evaluation of Quinoa as a Leafy Green Crop
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Evaluation of Quinoa as a Leafy Green Crop
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Evaluation of the Phosphorous Bioavailability in Semiarid Soils
Project Director:  M. Zhu
Year: 2016
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Exploring Agriculture: Learning Opportunities for Under-Represented Populations
Project Director:  James Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
The overall goal of the project is to attract under-represented populations into careers in agriculture and related fields. Our approach for achieving this goal is to work with community colleges so that a student's first agriculture-related course opportunity is one that focuses primarily upon the actual job activities involved in agriculture. We call this course "Exploring Agriculture." Although some students may have already experienced an agriculture course before we meet them, our strategy would be to identify beforehand as many students as practical. As for the students taking traditional agriculture classes, that would be a follow-up to the "Exploring Agriculture" modules. The "Exploring Agriculture" options would include a different selection of courses that would include no classroom lectures but instead would be composed of one-day hands-on experiences on alternate weeks, some on campus and some off site. We predict that this approach will excite pre-baccalaureate students into enrolling into agricultural programs, students that would otherwise never consider taking a course in agriculture. Ultimately, after the "Exploring Agriculture" course, an increased portion of the students would be motivated to take the courses already in our agriculture curriculum and develop the skills that will qualify them to work in various agricultural industries. Since this is a planning-conference project, our short-term goal is to organize a team of collaborators from the target areas (e.g., horticulture, forestry, agricultural engineering, etc.) to plan for submitting a Large-scale Comprehensive Initiative (LCI) Higher Ed Challenge Grant in 2016 for developing the actual training and mentoring programs for undergraduate students. During this conference-planning project, we expect to identify instructors for "Exploring Agriculture" that include private companies, public agencies, and academic institutions.
Feed Efficiency Selection: Impacts on Carcass, Behavior, and Reproduction Traits
Project Director:  Scott Lake
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Our overall objectives are to measure the impact of selection of high and low Residual Feed Intake (RFI) bulls in a crossbreeding program on short term calf performance and longer term implications associated with replacement females. Specifically, our objectives are to measure: 1) the effect of bull selection with either high or low RFI value on steer and heifer calf feed efficiency, 2) the effect of bull selection with either high or low RFI value on feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of feedlot calves, 3) the effect of bull selection with either high or low RFI value on feeding behavior (feeding events, meals, daily intake), 4) the effect of bull selection with either high or low RFI value on reproductive performance, and 5) the effect of bull selection with either high or low RFI value on interactions within the production system.

Fenugreek
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Fenugreek
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Foliar Fungicide Effect on Early Blight Severity and Yield of Potato in Wyoming
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Foliar Fungicide Programs to Manage Potato Early Blight
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Food Dignity: action research on engaging food insecure communities and universities in building sustainable community food systems
Project Director:  Christine Porter
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1. Identifying, developing and evaluating scalable strategies for organizing SCFS for FS, in collaboration with communities facing food insecurity by: a.Developing and comparing retrospective case studies of SCFS for FS work in 5 communities: -Albany County, WY with Action Resources International -Wind River Reservation, WY with Blue Mountain Associates -Tompkins County, NY with Cornell Cooperative Extension, Tompkins County -Brooklyn, NY with East New York Farms! -Alameda County, CA with Dig Deep Farms & Produce b.Testing and evaluating a SCFS organizing support "package" with each community, including support for a community organizer, a steering committee, microgrants, community "animators" or catalyzers, and community-based participatory research (CBPR) activities. c. Building and analyzing 4-year prospective case studies with each community, including documenting participation and actions/initiatives and tracking the impact of microgrants and other support package strategies. d.Evaluating the SCFS for FS impact of selected community initiatives as nested case studies. For example, we will quantify harvests and estimate economic and nutritional values of food produced in these gardens. We will also develop user-friendly, standardized methods that can be used in urban food producing systems for assessing other garden-related processes that stakeholders are interested in monitoring. 2. Expanding capacity to catalyze, support and research SCFS for FS in cooperative extension, community-based organizations (CBOs), citizens living in low-income communities, and universities through: a.Conducting the activities in Goal 1. b.Creating in-site and cross-site communities of practice with the 8 project partners for sharing and generating learning. c.Creating new undergraduate, cross-disciplinary minor areas of study in sustainable food systems (SFS) at University of Wyoming (UW) and Cornell University (CU) and expanding internship and service learning opportunities for students at these institutions and at Ithaca College (IC) in ways that serve both student and community needs and build on their assets. d.Developing several interactive online courses on SCFS for SF, plus policy, practice and research briefs, available nationally for cooperative extension and CBOs and for integration into university courses.

Food, Feed, Fuel, and Fiber: Security Under a Changing Climate
Project Director:  Jay Norton
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Forage Grass-Legume Mixtures for Maximizing Profit
Project Director:  D. Dhakal
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:5,   VII:1  
Forage Kochia in Seeding Mixtures with Perennial Grass to Improve Disturbed Areas
Project Director:  P. Aryal
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1, 2,   VI:8,   X:2, 3,   XII:1  
Forage Kochia to Reclaim the Disturbed Areas and Use as a Forage Crop
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Fresh Cut Sunflower Production
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Year: 2017
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Fresh Cut Sunflowers in Two Wyoming Greenhouses
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Year: 2017
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Genetic and Maternal Influences on Progeny Rumen Microbiome and Feed Efficiency
Project Director:  Kristi Cammack
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Our overall hypothesis is that variation in the rumen microbiome is associated with variation in feed efficiency. Our project-specific hypothesis is that the rumen microbiome is established at or near birth and is subject to maternal influences that can impact long-term feed efficiency of beef cattle. Specifically, we aim todetermine the relative contributions of the 1) genotype (i.e. genetic background), 2) perinatal maternal environment, and 3) postnatal maternal environment on the progeny rumen microbiome and feed efficiency of beef calves. Our long-term goal is to improve beef cattle feed efficiency. To accomplish this, we need to determine the relative contributions of these influences. Those relative contributions will establish whether we concentrate on 1) improving the genetic merit of the animal, 2) using the dam's influence to improve efficiency through a maternal effect (e.g., exploit breed complementarity with crossbreeding), or 3) modifying a postnatal environmental effect to enhance favorable microbial populations (e.g., seed the rumen at birth).
Genetics and Genomics Research for Beef Cattle: Where's the Economics (for Wyoming and Beyond)?
Project Director:  Nicole Ballenger
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The overarching goal is to explore and better understand the benefits and distribution of benefits from public investments in beef genetics/genomics research. This effort involves the integration of information about scientific advances in genetics and genomics research, emerging genetic technologies, and the adoption and economic impacts of genetic technologies within the vertically segmented beef marketing system.The main objectives of this project are to:Garner an authoritative understanding of the investments in and diffusion of knowledge from beef genetics/genomics research.Match research investments and discoveries with categories of value-adding production strategies in the beef cattle industry, with a particular focus on strategies of most interest in Wyoming. [Aggregate value-adding strategies, which may be further refined as the research proceeds, include: Reproductive enhancements, fetal mortality, feeding efficiency and carcass weight, disease resistance, meat characteristics and quality improvements.]Develop a conceptual framework forexploring the benefits and distribution of benefits of genetic technologies within the vertically segmented beef cattle industry. Using Wyoming (and its closest beef market linkages, such as feedlots in Colorado and Nebraska) to explore producers' perceptions at different stages of the marketing chainand in different production environments(e.g. High Plains or Great Basin) of the value of different types of genetic information, and their use and anticipated use of genetic technologies to make economic decisions. Construct a Wyoming-centric illustrative model of the channels by which the benefits of genetic technologies adopted in the state or outside of the state potentially are shared between Wyoming and other beef industry participants. The Wyoming-based model can later be used to inform the specification of a full-blown beef sector model.Investigate and advance options for empirical modeling of returns to genetic technologies within the full U.S. beef cattle sector.Norwood and Lusk (2008) make the case that investments in beef genetics are less profitable than in poultry and pork, because beef markets are under much less vertical control than poultry and pork markets. They are under less vertical control because the biological cycle is longer, there are more stages of production, and larger geographic areas involved in the production stages.

Genetics of Resistance to High Altitude Disease (Brisket Disease) in Yak /Cow Hybrids
Project Director:  Mark Stayton
Department: Molecular Biology
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goal: Explore the possibility of incorporating at least partial altitude resistance from yak into commercial beef breeds.Specific Objectives: Generate a population of as many as 50, F1 hybrids (Dzo) between Bos taurus (dam) and Bos grunniens (sire). We will use artificial insemination (AI) on a super-ovulated donor cow followed by embryo capture and storage. Up to 40 surrogate dams will be impregnated to generate a population of full-sibling Dzo hybrids (F1 generation). If the embryo transfer technology proves inefficient with yak-cow hybrids, we will create our F1 generation using standard AI methods.Carry out PAP testing on the full-sibling Dzo calves at 7200 ft using the dam and age-matched steers as control.Carry out necropsies on the Dzo males and collect tissues for future use in histological and molecular breeding studies. (Dzo males are sterile.)Use standard AI to cross all Dzo heifers to the same Bos taurus bull. The resulting F2 calves (Stol) will be tested for pulmonary function at 7200 ft. If time permits, Stol steers will be fed, slaughtered and evaluated for carcass characteristics.

Genomic research and prediction technologies for beef cattle: Where
Project Director:  Nicole Ballenger
Year: 2015
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V   VII   VIII  
Germains sugar beet trial
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
GIS Application Enhancement and Data Automation for Use in Management and Decision Making at Research and Extension Centers in Powell, Laramie and Sheridan, Wyoming.
Project Director:  Doug Zalesky
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The goals and objectives of the proposed project are to: 1) develop a GIS system for the research centers at Powell, Sheridan and Laramie that meet the needs of the centers and can be populated with existing historical data and currently collected data. 2) To enhance the existing web-based GIS application, to enable use of data to formulate management decisions and to extend use to the research and extension (R&E) centers at Powell, Sheridan and Laramie. 3)To train all potential users of the GIS application on entering data, accessing data and utilization of the web-based application to generate efficient and effective management decisions. The expected outcomes include research center specific databases that include historical and current information, a web-based GIS application that allows integration of database information and additional tools that will allow iterative selection processes that meet the needs of the R&E centers. All potential users of the web-based application will be trained to enter and access data as well as utilize the web-based GIS application.

Goji Berry Propogation
Project Director:  Jeremiah Vardiman
Department: UW Extension
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Graduate Student Training and Research in the Molecular and Cellular Life Sciences
Project Director:  Jesse Gatlin
Department: Molecular Biology
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The MCLS Program was created for campus-wide life science faculty and students working in the areas of molecular and cellular biology. Its primary goal is to strengthen graduate education in the molecular and cellular life sciences and to provide a framework for increased competitiveness, retention, and productivity for students, faculty, and the university as a whole in the agricultural sciences. Objectives:To support ongoing studies of livestock disease, molecular genetics of animal disease, crop improvement, energy and materials science and science outreach, by recruiting and providing excellent graduate students to conduct research in molecular and cell biology.To enable collaboration among faculty members within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and support new faculty members by providing a functional research environment.To provide a venue for science outreach to students, teachers and the community.

Grass-Legume Mixture Study
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Greenhouse crops
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Greenhouse studies of forage and other species
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Growth and Pod Traits Correlate with Grain Yield among 50 Dry Bean Cultivars
Project Director:  J. Heitholt
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Herbicide injury workshop
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Herbs in high tunnels
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
High altitude (brisket) disease in beef cattle.
Project Director:  Richard McCormick
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major GoalExplore the genetic and physiological basis of Brisket disease and the relationships to cattle production.Objectives1. Develop a physical phenotype for animals in the Laramie Research & Extension Center Center cattle herd including physical screening for clinical signs of Brisket disease and identification of underperforming cattle.2. Correlate hemodynamic parameters (via PAP testing) with physical phenotype.3. Screen Bos germplasm for genetic resistance to high altitude disease.

Hydropedology of Vernal Pool Systems
Project Director:  Karen Vaughan
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Improve our understanding at a regional scale of how vernal pool ecosystems differ in distribution, hydrology, hydroperiod, redox chemistry, and carbon storage and flux. Along with this we will develop a better understanding of the effects of hydrology and temperature on carbon pools and sequestration in wetlands along a temperature gradient. Develop morphometric indices of the hydroperiod within vernal pools.

Identification and Subtyping of Antimicrobial Resistant Bacteria from Cattle Feeding Operations and associated Wildlife Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
Project Director:  Bledar Bisha
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The major goal of this project is to address mitigation strategies for antimicrobial resistant (AMR) bacteria in cattle operations by investigating novel identification and typing methods for these microorganisms. Specifically, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) will be evaluated and developed for this purpose using presumptive cephalosporin and fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus spp. isolates collected from cattle facilities and mammalian and avian wildlife from cattle facilities' surroundings. Objective 1: Identification of isolates from livestock facilities using MALDI-TOF MS. Approximately 3,000 presumptive AMR E. coli, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus spp. isolates will be identified via MALDI-TOF MS using formic acid/ethanol extractions (suitable for genus, and usually species identifications) for sample preparation. Objective 2: Development and optimization of sample preparation and data analysis strategies to enable subtyping by MALDI-TOF MS. A variety of sample preparation procedures (solvent systems, detergent extractions, enzymatic treatments, sample fractionation, and multiple MALDI matrices) will be evaluated using panels of well characterized bacteria from environmental, human, and food sources, with specific focus on E. coli, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus spp. Objective 3: Using optimized protocols in Objective 2, we will perform subtyping analysis on the confirmed target AMR bacteria and generate novel mass spectral reference libraries. The optimal sample preparation and data analysis procedures determined in Specific Aim 2 will be applied to isolates identified in Specific Aim 1 as E. coli,Enterococcus, Staphylococcus spp. Representative panels of the confirmed isolates will also be subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial sensitivity testing for comparative evaluations of MALDI-TOF MS typing efficacy. The discriminatory mass spectral data, determined through extensive bioinformatic interpretations and by indirect comparisons to PFGE/antimicrobial sensitivity profiles, will be used to build reference mass spectral libraries.

Impact Analyses and Decision Strategies for Agricultural Research (NC1003)
Project Director:  Matt Andersen
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Impact of chemical practices on soil-borne pathogens of sugarbeet in the High Plains
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:6  
Impact of cultural and chemical practices on soil-borne pathogens of sugarbeet in the Bighorn Basin
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:7,   II:6,   III:6,   X:2  
Impact of Dietary Forage Quality on Ruminal Bypass of Calcium Salts of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Beef Heifers When Provided in Dried Molasses Lick Tubs
Project Director:  D.C. Rule
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1, 4  
Impact of histophilosis on bovine respiratory disease
Project Director:  Kerry Sondgeroth
Year: 2016
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Impact of histophilosis on bovine respiratory disease on commercial beef operations
Project Director:  Kerry Sondgeroth
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

i: Seroprevalence: Determine seroprevalence (= proportion of positive cattle) of H. somni in calves as they enter feedlots, and during the major risk period for bacterial pneumonia (0 - 60 days after placement). This involves using two recently developed serological assays specific for H somni. Testing will be done in replicate and in cooperation with Wyoming producers with endemic H. somni on their properties (years 2 and 3).ii: H. somni in fatal pneumonia: Establish the relative importance of H. somni as a contributor to fatal pneumonia in cattle by frequency of detection (by laboratory culture, PCR and IHC) relative to other infectious causes of pneumonia (years 2 and 3).iii: H. somni and Mycoplasma bovis concurrence in fatal pneumonia: Define concurrence of H. somni with M. bovis in pneumonia (years 2 and 3).

Improving Feed Efficiency Through Rumen Manipulation
Project Director:  Kristi Cammack
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Improving Marginal Habitat Restoration in Western Rangelands: Ecological Genetic and Landscape Approaches to Mountain Mahogany Shrubland Reclamation
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

In recent years, restoration protocols have experienced a shift in emphasis from non-native to native seed sources as land managers recognized the adaptive significance of native plant species. However, native plant seeds are scarce; and when supplies are available, seeds are often derived from plant populations either hundreds of kilometers distant or with unknown origin. Nonlocal genotypes may not be suited to site conditions due to adaptive differences among populations within a plant species. As a result, the geographic origin of seed stock can have significant consequences for restoration outcomes. Despite the difficulty in obtaining local germplasm, the use of local provenance plant materials is considered best practice to avoid introductions of maladapted genotypes, and to preserve biodiversity. However, data are often lacking that describe the extent of adaptive differentiation and define the geographic range within which plants are "local." Recently, researchers have proposed molecular marker delineation of seed zones as a rapid alternative to longterm field research. Marker-delineated provenance zones are a promising method, but many questions arise with their use, and these techniques require field testing. Although we know ecotypic variation is common in native flora, we do not have data for the occurrence and extent of differentiation in Cercocarpus montanus (mountain mahogany). Addressing this gap in knowledge is critical to match appropriate seed sources for reclamation sites, and to improve restoration success and rangeland health. Data derived from this study will test different methods for seed zone delineation and contribute to mining and grazing reclamation efforts for mountain shrublands in Wyoming and throughout the region. Objective 1: Investigate genetic diversity of Cercocarpus montanus and delineate seed zones based on molecular marker differentiation. Our working hypothesis is that molecular genetic analysis of C. montanus samples collected at similar ecological sites will share markers correlated with distinct environmental characteristics. Knowledge of molecular marker variation would then serve as a guide for successful revegetation with plant materials adapted to reclamation sites. Objective 2: Determine the relationship of marker-based transfer zones and successful establishment under different climate and habitat conditions. Our working hypothesis is that seedling performance in reciprocal transplant studies using common

Improving Mycorrhizal Status of Soil Using Cover Crops
Project Director:  B. Alsunuse
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:3, 7,   IV:3  
Improving Profitability and Sustainability of Sheep Production Through Genetic Selection
Project Director:  Kristi Cammack
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Our long-term goal is to improve profitability and sustainability of the sheep industry by identifying and developing methods to improve production efficiency and increase visibility of the industry. For this project, our particular goals are to improve profitability and sustainability of sheep production by improving feed efficiency, and to increase industry visibility and communication by creating a Community of Practice focused on Sheep Production and Management for inclusion in the eXtension network. Specific goals and objectives are as follows: Objective 1: Foster sheep production through increased visibility of the industry and improvements in efficiency of production. This will be accomplished by 1) developing a Sheep Production and Management Community of Practice for eXtension; and 2) advancing feed efficiency as a measure of economic importance to producers. Objective 2: Determine the economic implications of genetic selection for feed efficiency in sheep. This will be accomplished by 1) determining of the economic implications of selection for improved feed efficiency (e.g., profitability, stocking ratios); and 2) determining of other economic benefits associated with improvements in feed efficiency, including greenhouse gas credits and marketing opportunities. Objective 3: Determine the potential of rumen microbial profiles to predict feed efficiency in grazing sheep. This will be accomplished by 1) determining the differences in rumen populations in highly efficient versus lowly efficient sheep, and 2) determining the predictive ability of rumen microbial profiles to estimate feed efficiency. Objective 4: Determine the relationship between improved feed efficiency and reduced methane production in sheep. This will be accomplished by comparing rumen microbial profiles of highly efficient sheep with low-methane producing sheep. This will be accomplished through collaborative efforts with an international partner, AgResearch of New Zealand. For outputs, in the short-term, we expect to: 1) transfer knowledge and awareness of sheep production practices and products to consumers, educators, etc., through the development of a Sheep Production and Management CoP to be administered through eXtension; 2) transfer knowledge regarding importance of feed efficiency to sheep production and profitability through the CoP and other extension outlets; 3) determine if rumen microbial profiles are predictive of feed efficiency in grazing sheep, which will espe

Improving Restoration of True Mountain Mahogany Habitat
Project Director:  T. Crow
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   X:1,   XII:1  
Improving Safety and Health of Wildland Firefighters Through Personal Protective Clothing
Project Director:  Bruce Cameron
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
In vitro assessment of effects of dietary forage quality on ruminal bypass of calcium salts of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids for cattle
Project Director:  Daniel C. Rule
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1, 5  
In-Furrow Fungicide Treatments to Manage Rhizoctonia Diseases in Sugarbeet
Project Director:  W. Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Indaziflam Cheatgrass Trial
Project Director:  Brian Mealor
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Indaziflam Cheatgrass Trial
Project Director:  Brian Mealor
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Indaziflam use in alfalfa for weed control
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Influence of Ewe Breed and Age on Sheep Ked (Melophagus ovinus [L.]) Infestations
Project Director:  J. D. Scasta
Year: 2016
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   V:7,   VI:1  
Instruction
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Integrated Approach to Enhance Efficiency of Feed Utilization in Beef Production Systems
Project Director:  Scott Lake
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Integrated Diagnostic Laboratory Investigation of Animal Disease
Project Director:  Will Laegreid
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1. Insure that submissions to the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory represent an accurate reflection of the incidence of disease in domesticated and wild animal species throughout Wyoming and the region2. Determine the cause and pathogenesis of naturally occurring diseases in wildlife and domestic animals, identify those potentially impacting human health, and identify those that may be due to environmental causes3. Document and track the incidence, prevalence and trends of spontaneous diseases as they occur state-wide4. Sustain the infrastructure to assure timely and up-to-date animal disease diagnostic testing and methodology across species5. Leverage preliminary data from spontaneous disease in animals and wildlife or studies of environmental toxins to generate extramural grants to support applied and basic research

Integrated Investigation of Molecular Mechanisms Important for Health and Agriculture in Wyoming
Project Director:  Mark Stayton
Department: Molecular Biology
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Our goal is to develop common-use technology and physical resources in support of the research mission of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and the Department of Molecular Biology with the following objectives:Support ongoing studies of livestock disease, molecular genetics of animal disease, food safety, crop improvement, sustainable energy and science outreach, by maintaining a robust research infrastructure in the areas of molecular and cell biology and microbiology.Enable collaboration among faculty members within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources and support new faculty members by providing a functional research environment.Provide a venue for science outreach to students, teachers and the community.Achievement of Objective 1 will require the Department to provide access to and maintain autoclaves, cold rooms, and instrumentation such as spectrophotometers, PCR, qPCR, imagers, incubators, specialty freezers and other instrumentation in addition to animal facilities as described in our management plan. Objective 2 is aimed at building our human resources by (a) hiring of elite new faculty members, which is dependent on a supportive research infrastructure, and (b) building research ties to research stations and community colleges in Wyoming, which often are limited in their access to research instrumentation. Objective 3 will enable education both at K-12 as well as our community colleges by providing resources and a venue for training in the molecular life sciences.

Integrating generic & new generation pesticides with cultural methods for disease management in dryland and irrigated High Plains cropping systems
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goal(s):Each year, new formulations of generic and new generation (experimental) pesticides are being produced for potential markets in the United States. The goals of this project are to test efficacy and integration of these products in a wide variety of Wyoming cropping systems. Pesticides are registered and labeled for agricultural use only after numerous trials and years of testing and disease evaluations that demonstrate the activity and safe use of the product. Wyoming and the High Plains production region present challenging environmental conditions that can potentially impact disease pest cycles and efficacy of pesticides and it is important to provide local-relevant research based efficacy information to our stakeholders.Objectives:1. Test efficacies of generic and new generation pesticides for a variety of Wyoming crops under the High Plains climate. Pesticides will be tested in dry bean, sugar beet and potato against diseases common to these crops and region.2. When appropriate, pesticide trials will integrate additional cultural methods such as tillage programs, resistant varieties and pesticide placement (in-furrow, seed treatment).3. Provide producer/stakeholders research-based information that enables modification or adoption of cost-effective plant disease management strategies.

Integrating herbicides with cultural weed management practices in dryland and irrigated Western cropping systems
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1) Evaluate efficacy of available weed control practices on economically important weed species;2) Increase understanding of basic biology and ecology of economically damaging weeds in the region (such as common lambsquarters, kochia,nightshade species, and winter annual grasses);3) Develop integrated management recommendations based on the biology and ecology of these important species, and the efficacy of available weed management tools.

Inter-planting forage legumes with grain corn for late-season forage production
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:3, 6, 9  
Intercropping cover crop mix with confection sunflower
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2  
Intercropping Forage Legumes with Grain Corn for Late-Season Forage Production
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:3, 6, 9  
Interplanting forage legumes with grain corn for late season forage production
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Introduction to the Fifth Edition of the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station Field Days Bulletin
Project Director:  B.W. Hess
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  B. Baumgartner
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the James C. Hageman Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  J. A. Tanaka
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Laramie Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  D. Zalesky
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Laramie Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  D. Zalesky
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Laramie Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  Doug Zalesky
Year: 2017
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Powell Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  C. Reynolds
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Powell Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  C. Reynolds
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Sheridan Research and Extension Center
Project Director:  B.A. Mealor
Year: 2015
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Introduction to the Sixth Edition of the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station Field Days Bulletin
Project Director:  B.W. Hess
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Investigations in Plant pathology
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Irrigating Chives in a Greenhouse and Two High Tunnels
Project Director:  T. Gergeni
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Irrigating Chives in a Greenhouse and Two High Tunnels - Completion Report
Project Director:  T. Gergeni
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Kentucky bluegrass seed production study
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Limited irrigation in corn
Project Director:  Dow Agrosciences
Department: Industry
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Local Food Production resubmitted March7 2014
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Local Food Production resubmitted March7 2014
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Management and Policy Challenges in a Water-Scarce World
Project Director:  Kristiana Hansen
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Management of diseases caused by Rhizoctonia in sugarbeet with in-furrow fungicide applications at planting
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Management of Potato Diseases with In-Furrow Fungicide Applications
Project Director:  W. Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Management of potato early blight with foliar fungicide programs in potato
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Management of Rhizoctonia Diseases of Sugarbeet Under a Replant Scenario with Various Fungicide Application Methods
Project Director:  W. Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Management of Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot with In-Furrow and Banded Fungicide Applications
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Management of Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot with Single Fungicide Applications at Planting Under a Sugarbeet Replant Scenario
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Management of soil-borne disease in dry bean with in-furrow fungicide applications at planting
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Management of sugarbeet cyst nematode with a combination of seed treatments and in-furrow nematicides
Project Director:  William Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Mapping Function Value Traits in Brassica rapa (Field Mustard, Turnip)
Project Director:  R. Baker
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII:1  
Matching Cow Size to Wyoming Rangeland Conditions
Project Director:  J.D. Scasta
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   V:7,   VI:3,   VIII:3  
Maternal and genetic influences on offspring rumen microbes and performance
Project Director:  Hannah Cunningham
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1  
MB906 Trial
Project Director:   Brian Mealor
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Meadow Bromegrass in Mixture with Alfalfa Affects Light and Nitrogen Acquisition, Forage Yield, and Nutritive Value
Project Director:  Dennis Ashilenje
Year: 2017
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2   VII  
Mechanical renovation of deteriorating alfalfa stands
Project Director:  Daniel Smith
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:7,   II:6  
Millercoors Variety trial
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Animal Science
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
MillerCoors variety trial
Project Director:  Andi Pierson
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
mixed cover crops in furrow-irrigated sugarbeet-barley rotations
Project Director:  Jay Norton
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Modernizing the GIS-supported Study Area Resource Request Application through JavaScript/HTML5 Programming Tools
Project Director:  Doug Zalesky
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

There are 6 major goals/objectives of this project and they are listed below:Leverage and streamline existing application functionality and capabilities, and identify and prioritize additional ones with input from major stakeholders.Develop SARRA 2.0 through JavaScript, HTML5 and other cutting-edge web-based application programming tools.Develop content and deliver end-user training on SARRA 2.0.Explore the feasibility of porting specific SARRA components to mobile platform.Investigate the potential applicability of SARRA 2.0 beyond Wyoming.Develop a stewardship plan for SARRA 2.0 after its release.

Molecular Mechanism Mediating the effects of Obesity on Cardiac Function and Development in Fetuses and Offspring of Obese Mothers
Project Director:  Wei Guo
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiac dysfunction and chronic heart failure. Maternal obesity (MO) caused by high-energy diets is harmful for maternal health, and also causes heart failure (HF) in the children and grandchildren of obese women. MO may lead to impaired developmental transitions of proteins in the fetus and thus affect offspring in postnatal life. For example, the deficiency of splicing factor-RNA binding motif 20 (RBM20) leads to larger titin isoform expression from fetal development through adulthood, which results in progressive heart failure in rats, and loss of cardiac function caused by a RBM20 mutation in humans leads to end-stage heart failure. However, the detailed mechanisms remain poorly understood. Since our preliminary data demonstrated that titin isoform transition might play a critical role in the development of HF, we propose the following specific objectives: Objective 1. Examine whether maternal obesity affects titin isoform transition and relevant alternative splicing factors in cardiac muscle of fetuses and adult offspring and identify whether MO leads to exon variants in cardiac tissue caused by altered splicing factors with next generation sequencing. Objective 2. Evaluate the impact of maternal obesity on myocyte mechanical properties of fetuses and adult offspring by testing myocyte contractility and force measurements.

Molecular mechanisms mediating the effects of maternal obesity on cardiac function and development in fetuses and offspring of obese mothers
Project Director:  Wei Guo
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Skeletal Muscle Growth and Differentiation
Project Director:  Wei Guo
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Characterize the signal transduction pathways that regulate skeletal muscle growth and metabolism including the influence of endogenous growth factors and various production practices. Characterize the cellular and molecular basis of myogenesis.

Multi-state Evaluation of Winegrape Cultivars and Clones
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Multiple
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Multistate Research Coordination, Western Region
Project Director:  Bret Hess
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Myxobacteria as Biocontrol Agents against Crop Pathogens
Project Director:  D. Wall
Year: 2016
Department: Molecular Biology
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII:2  
NAHLN Testing - University of Wyoming, Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory
Project Director:  Myrna Miller
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory (WSVL) is an American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians-accredited animal disease diagnostic laboratory. The WSVL has been a `member laboratory' of the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN) for several years and successfully renewed this membership through June, 2012. The WSVL is currently approved to test for animal diseases of importance to national security or that are considered to be of high national importance including foot and mouth disease, classical swine fever, vesicular stomatitis, avian influenza, exotic Newcastle disease, chronic wasting disease, and scrapie. The WSVL is taking steps to continue membership in the NAHLN and to increase the value of WSVL as a member laboratory. For small public-funded laboratories in sparsely populated states, it is a challenge to maintain currency and offer a complete menu of routine diagnostic tests while at the same time maintaining a commitment to the NAHLN for testing of high impact diseases. Adequate depth in trained technical staff is necessary to ensure that demands of routine as well as NAHLN testing are satisfied. Ensuring that equipment/instruments are professionally maintained and calibrated will help guarantee the accuracy of results and avoid costly downtime. Objective #1 is to request continued partial salary support for this technical staff member who is currently proficiency tested for several diseases under the auspices of the NAHLN. Objective #2 is to request dollar support to defray maintenance and calibration costs for two Cepheid SmartCyclers. Achieving these two objectives will address laboratory issues specified in the NAHLN RFA. Testing through the NAHLN helps to insure the health and well being of the nation's livestock and wildlife and to preserve public health.

New, Emerging, and Re-emerging Animal Diseases: Wyoming and the Intermountain Region
Project Director:  Will Laegreid
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Goals and objectives are to: 1) identify and characterize new, emerging, or re-emerging spontaneous diseases in domestic animals and wildlife, including those potentially impacting human health; 2) determine the cause and pathogenesis of new, emerging, or re-emerging spontaneous diseases in wildlife and domestic animals; 3) document and track the incidence, prevalence and trends of spontaneous diseases as they occur state-wide; 4) validate commercial diagnostic tests or develop new tests for diseases in wildlife and domestic animals; similarly, validate or develop new assays for environmental toxins that have the potential to adversely affect animal or human health; and 5) leverage preliminary data from real-world cases of spontaneous disease or toxins in animals and wildlife or studies to generate extramural grants to support applied and basic research. Attainment of these goals and objectives will increase the knowledge about new, emerging, or re-emerging diseases in animals. This knowledge will help prevent or mitigate the effects of disease and toxins in animals, humans, and the environment. Knowledge acquired will be integrated into teaching efforts and disseminated to stakeholders through scientific and lay meetings publications, and press.

Nitrogen fertilization of dry bean: A search for greater efficiency going forward
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Nitrogen-By-Dry Bean Cultivar
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
NK cell memory in long-term immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.
Project Director:  Jason Gigley
Department: Molecular Biology
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Currently, no vaccines or drugs are capable of adequately treating Toxoplasma in livestock. An effective vaccine for T. gondii in agricultural animals should accomplish two goals: 1) reduce infection induced abortions, and 2) Reduce or eliminate parasite tissue burdens in food animals to prevent food source contamination. Good vaccine design relies on a good knowledge base. To this end, our major goal is to increase knowledge of immune system function required for optimal immunity to Toxoplasma sowe can design a highly effective vaccine or treatment to improve animal health. Specifically, we will dissect the role of Natural Killer cells (NK) in adaptive immunity to T. gondii and define mechanism(s) behind this functional development. To improve agriculture animal health and prevent infection induced abortions caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. We will investigate how the Natural Killer cell plays a role in long lasting immune responses to this pathogen. We will then dissect the mechanisms by which they develop this activity. Achieving the goals will improve vaccine and therapy efficacy to treat this infection.

Nk cells in Toxoplasma infection
Project Director:  Jason Gigley
Department: Molecular Biology
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
NRPN
Project Director:  Jerry Nachtman
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
NRPN
Project Director:  Jerry Nachtman
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
NRPN
Project Director:  Jerry Nachtman
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Nuclear Size Regulation by NTF2 in Melanoma Cancer Cells
Project Director:  D. L. Levy
Year: 2016
Department: Molecular Biology
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Omega-3 supplementation for beef cattle and sheep: impacts on tissue composition, reproduction, and development of offspring
Project Director:  Daniel Rule
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goal: To determine the effectiveness of rumen-inert long-chain omega-3 fatty acids on growth and reproductive parameters in cattle and sheep.Objectives:1: Determine the effectiveness of molasses lick tubs as a delivery system for long-chain n-3 fatty acids, when present as the calcium salt (rumen inert) of fish oil, for supplementation of grass-fed beef cattle.2: Determine the effects of supplemental long-chain n-3 fatty acids on reproductive efficiency of beef cows and heifers when the fatty acids are provided as the calcium salt of fish oil using the molasses lick tub delivery system.3: Determine the impact of cow and heifer rumen inert n-3 fatty acid supplementation on milk fatty acids and calf health.4: Determine the effectiveness of molasses lick tubs as a delivery system for long-chain n-3 fatty acids, when present as the calcium salt (rumen inert) of fish oil, for supplementation of forage fed lamb.5: Determine the effects of supplemental long-chain n-3 fatty acids on reproductive efficiency of ewes when the fatty acids are provided as the calcium salt of fish oil using the molasses lick tub delivery system. Additionally, the impacts on milk composition and lamb health will be determined.

On-Farm Determination of the Effect of Early Termination of Irrigation and Seeding Rates on Yield and Quality of Confection Sunflower
Project Director:  V.R. Joshi
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2   IV  
Optimization of a Non-Surgical Artificial Insemination Technique Utilizing Estrous Synchronization and Frozen-Thawed Ram Semen
Project Director:  P. H. Purdy
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:9  
Overcoming Honey Bee Pollination Market Information Deficiencies in the Intermountain West and Pacific Coast
Project Director:  Chian Jones Ritten
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The long-term goal of this research is to determine the structure and competitiveness of the pollination services market in order that this information will create efficiency within the market and produce the optimal quantity of honey bee colonies to help safeguard U.S. food security. The objective of this application is to determine growers' value for specific honey bee and beekeeper attributes across a variety of crops. The central hypothesis is that growers value specific beekeeper and honey bee attributes, which may be expressed through varying willingness to pay (WTP) for pollination services in pollination contracts with heterogeneous beekeepers. This study proposes to collect preliminary focus group and survey data from growers that contract with beekeepers for pollination services in the Intermountain West and Pacific Coast to determine which attributes are most valuable and how much growers are willing to pay for such attributes when entering into pollination contracts.The following research aims will be used to meet the present objective and long-term goal:1. Identify attributes of managed honey bees and beekeepers that growers value when negotiating pollination contracts and how these attributes vary across crops2. Estimate the value of honey bee and beekeeper attributes through determining grower's WTP for such attributes in pollination contracts

Parenting, energy dynamics, and lifestyle determinants of childhood obesity: New directions in prevention
Project Director:  Enette Larson-Meyer
Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Participatory breeding of winter-hardyvegetable peas for Wyoming
Project Director:  Christopher Hilgert
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Pea seed increase
Project Director:  Mike Moore
Department: Seed Certification
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Perennial cool-season grasses for hay production and fall grazing under full and limited irrigation
Project Director:  Blaine Horn
Department: UW Extension
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

To provide agricultural producers of NE Wyoming and surrounding areas information on the forage production potential and forage quality of cool-season perennial grasses grown under full and limited irrigation so they can make informed decisions on the selection of grasses for their operations.Objectives:(1) determine late spring/early summer hay yields of perennial cool-season grasses under full and reduced irrigation regimes;(2) determine forage quality of the hay from these grasses and compare to the needs of livestock;(3) determine the amount of regrowth the grasses produce for fall grazing;(4) determine the forage quality of the regrowth of these grasses and again compare to the needs of livestock; and,(5) compare net returns of forage production as well as per unit costs of producing qualitative measures such as dry matter (DM), N, etc., with full and reduced irrigation.

Perennial Cool-Season Grasses for Hay Production and Fall Grazing Under Full and Limited Irrigation
Project Director:  B. E. Horn
Year: 2016
Department: UW Extension
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   IV:4  
Photooxidative damage in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas and its Reduction by Heterologous Protein Expression
Project Director:  Stephen Herbert
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

To help domesticate algae for production of petroleum replacements, the following objectives will be pursued.Objective 1: Sensitivity of Chlamydomonas mutants to defined oxidative stresses will be determined. These data will indicate mechanisms of stress tolerance that could be enhanced by heterologous proteins expression.Objective 2: Based upon findings from Objective 1, strategies for heterologous protein expression in Chlamydomonas will be developed and tested for reduction of photooxidative damage. Initial strategies will include heterologous expression of antioxidant enzymes.

Pinto Bean Rhizoctonia Root Rot Management with In-Furrow Fungicides
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Planting Date Effect on Winter Forage Crops for Supplemental Cornstalk Grazing
Project Director:  J. Meeks
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2, 4, 6,   II:5,   V:7,   VI:1, 3,   VII:2, 6  
Policy Experiments for the Intermountain West Native Seed Industry
Project Director:  B.R. Mock
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:6,   XII:1  
Pollinator Food Plots
Project Director:  Jeff Edwards
Department: UW Extension
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Pollinator Food Plots
Project Director:  Jeff Edwards
Department: UW Extension
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Pollinator food plots demonstration
Project Director:  Jeff Edwards
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Potato disease management
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Potato Early Blight Management in Wyoming with GWN-10126 Combinations
Project Director:  W. Stump
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Potato Studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Potato Studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Potato Studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Potatoe Production Practices
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Potential of forage kochia for reclamation of disturbed lands
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Pre-emergence weed control for dry beans
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Pre-plant weed control in sugarbeet
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:1, 7  
Preplant herbicides for sugarbeet
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Prevalence of Brucella ovis in Wyoming domestic sheep
Project Director:  Kerry Sondgeroth
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Prevalence of Brucella ovis in Wyoming domestic sheep
Project Director:  K. Sondgeroth
Year: 2016
Department: Veterinary Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Priming Science: Writing Emerging Science to Engage Resource Navigators
Project Director:  Ann Hild
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Goals are to document the impact of framing language on the reception of scientific communications by natural resource managers. We will document the differences among different priming language that introduces scientific concept decscriptions. We propose to apply this knowlede to improving the impact of science by demonstrating ways to incerease receptiveness to science in written presentations.

Priming Science: Writing Emerging Science to Engage Resource Navigators
Project Director:  K. Gunther
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   IX:2, 4, 5  
Productivity and Profitability of Irrigated Grass-Legume Mixtures
Project Director:  A.T. Adjesiwor
Year: 2015
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:5,   VII:1  
Quality Response of Irrigated Silage Corn under On-Surface and Sub-Surface Drip Irrigation Systems
Project Director:  A. Nilahyane
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:2,   IV:3, 4  
Quantifying production of ecosystem services by Western ranchers
Project Director:  Philip Lavallee Jr.
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VI:1, 3, 5,   VII:2, 4  
Quantitative Variation in the Circadian Clock Affects Plant Performance
Project Director:  M. Salmela
Year: 2016
Department: Botany
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII:1  
Rangeland Sustainability: Social-Ecological Resiliency
Project Director:  John Tanaka
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1. To determine the economic feasibility of cattle management practices.2. To determine the economic and ecological relationships and tradeoffs of alternative rangeland policies at the landscape and ecosystem level.3. To determine the economic and ecological consequences, tradeoffs, and linkages of management practices and policies used to rehabilitate or maintain rangeland ecosystems on private and public lands.4. To investigate the ecological, social, and economic values of ecosystem services from rangeland ecosystem restoration and investigate social-ecological linkages of rural communities and economies to rangelands.

Reclaiming Exotic Invasions on Energy Disturbances in Wyoming Basin Shrublands
Project Director:  Ann Hild
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

This project addresses reclamation on energy-disturbed sites to return ecosystem integrity, critical sagebrush and salt-desert shrubland habitat for species of concern and forage for domestic stock and wildlife. This research will enhance mitigation efforts and ecological integrity of extraction sites. We hypothesize that opportunity to increase seeded native establishment and limit annual exotic production may be realized by 1) augmenting early spring moisture to enhance germination of the seedbank (seedbank depletion) followed by 2) control of exotic seedlings before they mature and set seed (tilling) and 3) seeding competitive native species to capture the advantage of a reduced annual exotic seedbank and out-compete the remaining annuals. Objectives: To develop revegetation strategies for returning native species to arid and semi-arid shrublands by 1) investigating tactics to reduce weed seed banks and thus enhance reseeding success, 2) seeding native competition to limit presence of invasive species and 3) evaluate cultural and mechanical seeding treatments to exhaust the seedbank, to limit weed encroachment into disturbed sites and enhance native seedings.

Reducing direct harvest losses in conservation tillage dry bean production
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The overall goal of this project is to increase the profitability and sustainability of dry bean production. We propose achieving this goal by developing practices that reduce harvest losses when direct-harvesting dry beans in a conservation tillage system. We feel that by developing solutions to the problem of harvest loss, more dry bean growers will be interested in adopting these practices.Based on our preliminary work, we propose two specific objectives for this 2-year research project:Specific objective #1: Determine the impact of previous crop residue on dry bean growth habit and harvest loss. Our working hypothesis for this objective is that by increasing the amount of previous crop residue at the time of dry bean planting, we can modify the growth habit of the beans to grow taller and set pods further off the ground. We predict this change will reduce harvest loss when the crop is direct-harvested, but with minimal effect on dry bean yield potential.Specific objective #2: Develop appropriate recommendations for killing a winter cover crop during dry bean production to minimize dry bean yield reduction while also reducing harvest losses. For some dry bean growers, leaving wheat stubble on the soil surface will not be possible (different crop rotations, newly obtained land, etc.). In these cases it may be possible to plant a cover crop such as winter wheat in the fall, then plant dry beans into the cover crop in the spring. We had some success doing this in 2013 but we also had a rather dramatic failure in one treatment, where the wheat crop was terminated too late and severe dry bean yield reduction was observed.

Reducing Direct Harvest Losses in Conservation Tillage Dry Bean Production
Project Director:  C. Beiermann
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:3, 4, 7, 8, 9,   II:6,   IV:4,   IX:2, 4,   X:1, 2  
Regulation of Nuclear Size in Cancer Cells
Project Director:  D.L. Levy
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Regulatory Protocols for Current and Emerging Genome Editing Technologies in Crop Improvement
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The goal of the conference is to provide attendees at SIVB the latest updates on the current regulatory approval procedures in place, protocols used for risk assessment of transgene flow into the environment and how existing regulatory procedures can be applied for new/emerging technologies in genome editing and crop improvement. Specific objectives for the conference grant include 1) inviting experts to speak on regulatory protocols followed for risk assessment of crops developed through transgenic and advanced genome editing technologies and 2) to compare and contrast technologies used to study transgene-mediated pollen flow in the environment for perennial and annual crops.

Reproductive Performance in Domestic Ruminants
Project Director:  Brenda Alexander
Department: Animal Science
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Residual Corn Herbicide Effects on Fall Cover Crop Establishment
Project Director:  J. Meeks
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I   III   VI  
Response of Bird's-foot Trefoil Cultivars to Producer's Field
Project Director:  S. Sarkar
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   II:9,   IX:2  
Rhizoctonia Management in Sugarbeet with Xanthion
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Roundup Ready Alfalfa Variety Test
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Rumen Microbes Associated with Feed Efficiency in Lambs
Project Director:  M. J. Ellison
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1  
Rumen Microbes Associated with Response to High-Sulfate Drinking Water in Lambs
Project Director:  A. Abrams
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Rumen Microbial Changes in Response to High Sulfur Water
Project Director:  Kristi Cammack
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sage Grouse Forb Study
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Screening Accessions of Dry Bean for Tolerance to Drought
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Screening and development of dry bean genotypes for drought tolerance
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   X:3  
Screening Dry Bean for Stress Tolerance
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Screening Dry Bean Genotypes for Drought Tolerance
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Screening Dry Bean Genotypes for Drought Tolerance
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Screening Grain Crop Genotypes for Drought Tolerance in the High Plains and Intermountain West
Project Director:  James Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goals:1. Identify genotypes of dry bean that have superior drought tolerance.2. Establish new dry bean genotypes that combine drought tolerance from experimental lines with genotypes possessing high yield potential.

Screening Grapevine Cultivars
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Screening Grapevine Cultivars and Optimizing Management Practices for Improving Grapevine Production in Wyoming
Project Director:  S. A. Dhekney
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Screening Grapevine Cultivars for Adaptability to Soil and Climatic Conditions in Wyoming
Project Director:  S.A. Dhekney
Year: 2015
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Season Extension for Production of Vegetables under Protection Cultivation Systems
Project Director:  A. Erickson
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Seed Increase for Dry Bean Accessions
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Seed Source Research
Project Director:  Kristina Hufford
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Seed Treatment and In-Furrow Fungicide Effects on Rhizoctonia Stem Canker and Yield of Potato in Wyoming
Project Director:  M. Wallhead
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:3  
Seed treatments for Rhizoctonia management
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Shade Avoidance as a Mechanism of Yield Loss in Sugarbeet
Project Director:  T. Schambow
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:7  
Sheridan Research and Extension Center: 125 Years of Agricultural Research in Northeast Wyoming
Project Director:  B. A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Simplot Variety trial
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Animal Science
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Small Grain Studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Small Grain Studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Soil Organic Matter, Water Use, and Crop Response to Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilizer in Sugarbeet-Bean-Barley Rotations under Conservation Tillage, Cover Crops, and Limited Irrigation
Project Director:  Jay Norton
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Describe changes in soil organic matter dynamics, moisture dynamics, and N and P cycling with conversion to sprinkler irrigation and conservation tillage;Evaluate effects of incorporating cover crops into rotations;Develop revised soil fertility recommendations for N and P under six irrigation x tillage scenarios;Develop a technological exchange among researchers, producers, advisers, educators, and others.

Soil, Water, and Environmental Physics Across Scales
Project Director:  Thijs Kelleners
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
Soybean maturity group trial
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Spring and Fall Herbicide Application for Dalmatian Toadflax Control
Project Director:  J. M. Workman
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:2, 3, 5, 7  
State Winter Wheat Nursery
Project Director:  Jerry Nachtman
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Statewide Distribution of Cheatgrass Infestations in Wyoming
Project Director:  C.E. Noseworthy
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:5,   X:1,   XII:1  
Strategic management of invasive weeds in rangelands: from protection to restoration.
Project Director:  Brian Mealor
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goal: Identify desirable species that display the ability to compete with invasive weeds and that can establish and grow while stressors are applied to undesirable weeds.Objectives:1) Determine if ecological thresholds can be successfully identified for select invasive species and if they differ among ecological sites.2) Determine if highly competitive plant materials (including those collected from long-term weed invasions) can be identified and incorporated into invasive plant management programs to establish desirable native plant communities with an increased resistance to future encroachment by invasive species.3) Evaluate vertically-integrated weed management strategies to improve the condition and sustainability of disturbed or invaded rangeland ecosystems.

Strategic Sheep Grazing Effects on Yellow Sweetclover (Melilotus officinalis [L.] Lam.) Dominance and Structure
Project Director:  J. D. Scasta
Year: 2016
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   V:3,   VI:4, 5, 6  
Strip till and cover crops
Project Director:  Jay Norton
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Student Demo Plots
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Studies of Parasitoid Wasps Associated with Mountain Pine Bark Beetle
Project Director:  L. Haimowitz
Year: 2016
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Studies of parasitoid wasps associated with mountain pine beetle
Project Director:  Scott Shaw
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Major Goal of study:To provide identification and biological information for parasitoids of mountain pine beetle (MPB: Dendroctonus ponderosae) in Wyoming, and contribute to the standardization of sampling methods for the study of bark beetle parasitoids.Objectives: (1) We will use flight intercept traps, emergence traps and sampling of bark and wood from infested trees to acquire basic information (community composition, phenology, etc) about the MPB and MPB parasitoids in Wyoming.(2) Development of a novel emergence trap to sample bark beetle parasitoids emerging from standing, infested trees will allow us to test and standardize older methods that relied on sampling from felled trees.(3) We will analyze existing museum collections, past studies and current data to investigate effects of climate change on parasitoid-MPB relationships in Wyoming.(4) We will properly voucher museum specimens of sampled insects in the UW Insect Museum, including dried specimens and specimens preserved in alcohol, to preserve information, such as baseline population data and DNA, critical to future research.(5) We plan to use this project as the basis for future studies and collaborations, which will include similar studies along geographical and altitudinal gradients, the development and validation of standardized methodologies, biological studies of MPB and their parasitoids, and studies examining climate-induced changes in parasitoid/bark beetle relationships.

Studies of parasitoid wasps of forest ecosystems
Project Director:  Scott Shaw
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The goal of this CRIS project is to continue to build on my previous two decades of research in Wyoming forests by continuing sampling, specimen preparation, discovery, and documentation of Braconidae wasp species from forest ecosystems.The specific objectives of this research will be:1. prepare and deposit museum voucher specimens of Braconidae species,2. record new species and new biological host association data,3. discovery and publication of new species of Braconidae.

Study of heirloom, historic, and novel apple cultivars in century-old Wyoming orchards
Project Director:  Steven Miller
Year: 2015
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Studying cellular and physiological responses of grapevine to abiotic stress factors
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Studying grapevine abiotic stress tolerance
Project Director:  Sadanand Dhekney
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Studying propagation techniques for goji berry
Project Director:  Jeremiah Vardiman
Year: 2016
Department: UW Extension
Center: Sheridan
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   X:1  
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar beet studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sugar Beet Studies
Project Director:  William Stump
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sun Exposure in Growing Pigs Increases the Vitamin D Nutritional Quality of Pork
Project Director:  B. C. Ingold
Year: 2016
Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1,   V:5  
Sunflower Companion Crop
Project Director:  Camby Reynolds
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sunflower production
Project Director:  Gary Moss
Department: Animal Science
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sunflower Yields Deficit Irrigation
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Sustainable Agriculture in Eastern Wyoming
Project Director:  John Tanaka
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1. Discovery: To facilitate mission-linked scientific inquiry on agricultural systems that promote sustainable land and resource use.2. Dissemination: To disseminate knowledge developed through discovery to enhance the sustainability of agriculture systems for the future.3. Engagement: To facilitate dialogue among stakeholders with diverse roles and backgrounds to advance understanding and implementation of sustainable agriculture practices.

Sustainable IPM Strategies for Rangeland Grasshoppers in Wyoming and the West
Project Director:  Alexandre Latchininsky
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The overall goal of the proposed applied research is to further refine grasshopper control strategy ofReduced Area and Agent Treatments (RAATs)by including new IPM treatment options after their field evaluation. To achieve this goal, the following research objectives will be pursued:(1) Evaluate efficacy, economics and environmental impacts of new chemical control agents within the RAATs application strategy.(2) Develop practical guidelines for their use in RAATs context.(3) Field test biological grasshopper control agents to assess their potential for inclusion in the RAATs strategy.

Sustaining Legumes in Grasslands to Reduce Nitrogen Fertilization
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Systems analysis of shade-avoidance responses as a mechanism of crop yield loss due to weeds
Project Director:  Andrew Kniss
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The long-term goal of this project is to improve the sustainability of crop production through predictive understanding of the mechanism of crop yield loss due to weeds. In order to accomplish our long-term goal, we propose the following specific objectives for this research project:Determine the growth stages during its life cycle that Beta vulgaris yield is affected by shade avoidance responses.Quantify the root to shoot ratio changes from shade-avoidance responses and subsequent impact on soil water use and competition between weeds and Beta vulgaris.Use a process model-data fusion approach to test and improve methods for predicting crop yield loss from weed competition.

Targeted goat grazing for weed control
Project Director:  Mae Smith
Year: 2016
Department: UW Extension
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5,   VI:3, 4, 5,   XII:1  
Targeted Grazing for Dalmatian Toadflax and Geyer’s Larkspur Management
Project Director:  J.M. Workman
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5,   V:3,   VI:5,   VII:1  
Targeted Sheep Grazing for Dalmatian Toadflax and Geyer's Larkspur Management
Project Director:  J. M. Workman
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5,   V:3,   VI:5  
Technical and economic evaluation for on-farm drying of confection sunflowers and grain corn in the Big Horn Basin
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Harvesting confection sunflowers and grain corn with high moisture content is frequently the norm and not an alternative for growers in the Big Horn Basin. The economic outcome of these crops is affected by the added cost of drying and dockage suffered for delivering grain with high moisture content. Questions arise among farmers, such as, which is the best method to dry grains and if drying on-farm is an economically viable alternative. In order to answer some of these questions, a three-year study will be conducted at the Powell Research and Extension Center with the objective to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the current available options for drying confection sunflower and grain corn in the Big Horn Basin. The cost of using manual or automated controlled fans forcing natural or heated air for on-farm drying of confection sunflowers and grain corn with high moisture content will be estimated. The study will also provide information regarding the most efficient drying method in terms of time required for drying each crop. The ultimate goal is to provide producers with information that can assist them when deciding to implement on-farm drying of confection sunflower and grain corn. This management practice is associated with efforts to reduce yield and quality losses at harvest in both crops. Finally, based on the project findings in the future the feasibility of drying other crops grown in the region will be explored.

Technical and economic evaluation for on-farm drying of confection sunflowers and grain corn in the Bighorn Basin
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   IX:2  
Technology in the Lives Children and Youth: Preparing for the Future
Project Director:  Karen Williams
Department: Family and Consumer Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

Objectives: 1. To collect baseline data on parental, teacher, and child views and use of technology. 2. To qualitatively analyze baseline data for themes and issues. A particular focus will be to see if socioeconomic status (SES)and culture impact views and uses of technology. 3. To develop and pilot a survey for parents of 4-H youth program participants, 4-H leaders, and volunteers. 4. To collect baseline data on parental, 4-H leader, and volunteer perceptions and uses of technology in Wyoming. 5. To collect baseline data on the views of, interests in and knowledge of technology of 4-H youth program participants, particularly as it relates to culture and rural settings. 6. To make recommendations for youth programming, 4-H educator and volunteer training, and community education. 7. To disseminate the research findings and look at expanding to collaborative data collection in other states.

Testing Flowering Plants for Attraction to Beneficial Insects
Project Director:  Randa Jabbour
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Testing for suitable soybean maturity group for the Bighorn Basin
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:9,   II:9  
Testing for Suitable Soybean Maturity Group for the Bighorn Basin
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:9,   II:9  
The importance of U.S. food and agricultural trade in a new global market environment
Project Director:  Mariah Ehmke
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Source: NIFA
Status: Active
The role of the soil microbial community in restoration efforts of disturbed Wyoming forests and rangelands
Project Director:  Linda van Diepen
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The proposed research will focus on how restoration and management strategies affect the functioning of the soil microbial community to support an efficient, economical, and durable recovery of the plant community after disturbances. The goals are to understand how disturbances, includingfire escalations, outbreaks of pests, invasive plant species and resource extraction affect1) the soil microbial community composition, 2) their functioning with respect to nutrient cycling and organic matter decay, and 3) how potentialchanges in the microbial community may affect plant-microbe interactions and vegetation growth and composition.

Twin sex influence on puberty onset
Project Director:  Brenda Alexander
Department: Animal Science
Center: Laramie
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Understanding distribution and connectivity of species in changing landscapes
Project Director:  Melanie Murphy
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

I have three primary interrelated areas of research:Assess distribution & functional connectivity of species in changing landscapes.Maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function are central land management goals. To address these needs, I am developing and applying landscape genetic approaches to estimate current species' distribution and functional connectivity (the degree of movement or flow of organisms through their distribution on the landscape, necessary for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function). I am then applying this framework to estimate functional connectivity under potential land-use scenarios and assess risk of functional connectivity loss for a variety of species. Currently projects include: Greater Sage-grouse in NE Wyoming in relation to oil and gas development; Swift fox in Wyoming, Colorado and Texas (collaborating with Donnelle Schwalm, Texas Technical University/Oregon State University and Sam Cushman, USDA Forest Service RMRS) and Boreal chorus frogs in Northern Colorado in relation to land acquisition priorities (collaborating with W. Chris Funk, Colorado State University and Erin Muths, USGS).Evaluate water availability and ecosystem services under climate change scenarios. Climate change will affect not only temperature and moisture but timing. The timing of the water's presence is the critical factor affecting water availability for both biodiversity and anthropogenic use. Semi-permanent wetlands, those that retain water seasonally, may be an indicator of water availability. My aim is to assess surface water availability for both biodiversity and anthropogenic use by linking wetland hydroperiod (length of time water is available in a wetland) to climatic variation in a semi-arid environment. In this context, I am also investigating ecosystem services provided by beaver in the context of wetland dynamics (water quality and biodiversity). In addition, I am developing eDNA methods to identify wetland dependent species as a way to measure biodiversity while reducing observer bias.Develop and test analytical tools for landscape genetics. Reliable estimates of functional connectivity may require decades of field data, information not generally available when addressing pressing management concerns. In response to the challenge of quantifying functional connectivity, the emerging field of landscape genetics combines landscape ecology and population genetics. Landscape genetics applies molecular mark

Understanding Epigenetic Mechanisms of Lactation Failure
Project Director:  B. Cherrington
Year: 2015
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:1, 2  
Understanding Epigenetic Mechanisms of Lactation Failure
Project Director:  B. Cherrington
Year: 2016
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:1, 2  
Understanding the fate and transport of water under changing land use and climate
Project Director:  Ginger Paige
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The goal of this project is to establish and maintain field and laboratory studies that will improve the scientific understanding of the pathways of water movement through watersheds and ecosystems.Objectives:1. Quantify differences in hydrologic reponses in high alpine and rangeland watersheds using an established network of field instrumentation for watershed hydrologic observations.2. Use spatial datasets of watershed characteristics and hydrologic response units to characterize differences in contributing source areas with storm size and type.3. Develop analytical approaches and techniques for partitioning water movement through the field systems.

Understanding the Market for Wyoming Unadulterated Honey
Project Director:  Linda Thunstrom
Department: Economics and Finance
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

This project aims at analyzing how consumers evaluate health and ethical risks of consuming adulterated honey and how these risks influence consumer willingness to pay for unadulterated Wyoming honey. Our focus will be on Wyoming consumers. More specifically, our objective is to answer the following:Are consumers willing to pay a premium for Wyoming honey?Are consumers willing to pay a premium to ensure the honey theyconsume is not adulterated?Are consumers (in general, or subgroups) concerned about the health and ethical aspects of adulterated honey?Note: by unadulterated honey we meandomestically produced honey that has not been mixed with foreign produced honey, potentially higher in pesticides and antibiotics.

Understanding the Market for Wyoming Unadulterated Honey
Project Director:  L. Thunström
Year: 2015
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:5  
Unraveling the Mystery: Measuring Digestibility of Different Types of Baling Twine
Project Director:  T. S. Paisley
Year: 2016
Department: Animal Science
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1, 7  
Use of Perennial and Annual Flowers to Attract Beneficial Insects to Alfalfa
Project Director:  M. Benander
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1, 2,   X:2  
Use of Perennial and Annual Flowers to Attract Beneficial Insects to Alfalfa
Project Director:  M. Pellissier
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:1, 2,   X:2  
Using Next-Gen Sequencing to Identify Heirloom, Historic and Novel Apple Cultivars in 100 year-old Orchards in Wyoming and Montana as a Foundation for Marker- Assisted Breeding of Cultivars Specifically Suited to Different Regions of the Rocky Mounta
Project Director:  Steven Miller
Department: Botany
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The primary objective of the proposed research is to use next-generation sequencing and genotyping methodology to identify heirloom, historic and novel apple cultivars in 100 year-old orchards in Wyoming. This information will serve as a foundation for the next step in this research, which is to develop marker-assisted breeding of cultivars specifically suited to different climatic and edaphic regions of the Rocky Mountains. In addition, outreach objectives will be to save the important cultivars from different regions through grafting. Scionwood will be collected for grafting surviving trees onto hardy rootstock as part of an ongoing effort to save these trees and make them available to the public at grafting workshops.

Using Science-Based Solutions in Conservation of Threatened and Endangered Species: Sage-Grouse Case Study
Project Director:  Jeff Beck
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

1.To develop a process for scientist collaboration on assessing the best available science related to threatened and endangered species. This includes our ability: a.To understand the existing process for submitting science to the USFWS. b.To understand how land-grant universities are currently engaged in the process of ESA determinations. c.To find how land-grant universities can better engage in the process. d.To recommend how the process can be improved. 2.To document the process for scientist collaboration on assessing the best available science related to threatened and endangered species. 3.To integrate ecological, biological, economic, and social information to inform decision-makers.

Valuation of residual feed intake as a selection tool for northeast Wyoming range sheep producers
Project Director:  Kate Harlan
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1, 7, 8,   VII:6  
Valuation of Residual Feed Intake as a Selection Tool for Northeastern Wyoming Range Sheep Producers
Project Director:  M.K. Harlan
Year: 2015
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   V:1, 7,   VI:3,   VII:6  
Valuing the Non-Agricultural Benefits of Flood Irrigation in the Upper Green River Basin
Project Director:  S. Blevins
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:4, 6,   IX:1  
Vegetable varieties
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Vegetables and herbs under high and low tunnels
Project Director:  Karen Panter
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Vegetables and Herbs Under High and Low Tunnels
Project Director:  K. Panter
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Vitamin D Status from Sun Exposure in Swine in Laramie
Project Director:  B.C. Ingold
Year: 2015
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
W.W. Limited irrigation
Project Director:  Todd Flamming
Department: Industry
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
W.W. Seed treatment
Project Director:  Pete Forster
Department: Industry
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Weather monitoring in winter wheat variety trials
Project Director:  Keith Kennedy
Year: 2015
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII   X  
Weed control in dormant alfalfa
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:2, 7  
Weed Control in Dormant Alfalfa
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:2, 7  
Weed control in dry beans
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:4, 7  
Weed Control in Dry Beans
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:4, 7  
Weed control in new seedling alfalfa
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Weed control in seedling alfalfa
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:7  
Weed Control in Seedling Alfalfa
Project Director:  G. Sbatella
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:7  
Weed control programs for irrigated crops
Project Director:  Gustavo Sbatella
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

The long-term goal is to maintain or improve the productivity and sustainability of crop rotations in Wyoming, in the face of changes in the amount of water available for farming. The specific objectives of this project are to:Determine the impact of limited moisture on weed control practices for irrigated crops.Evaluate the effects of limited irrigation on biology and ecology of weed populations.Identify and develop viable agronomic and economic alternatives for weed control for irrigated crops grown under water restrictions.

Weed Management Strategies for Reclamation Success
Project Director:  Brian Mealor
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Sheridan
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Western Regional Spring Barley Nursery
Project Director:  Andi Pierson
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Western Regional Spring Barley Nursery
Project Director:  Andi Pierson
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: Powell
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Willingness to Pay and Information Demand for Locally Produced Honey
Project Director:  L. Thunstrom
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural and Applied Economics
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VII:5  
Winter Canola
Project Director:  Jerry Nachtman
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Winter Wheat Planting Date Trial: Platte County Dryland
Project Director:  J. Nachtman
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
Winter Wheat Variety Trial Nurseries: Eastern Wyoming Dryland and Irrigated
Project Director:  J. Nachtman
Year: 2016
Department: Agricultural Experiment Station
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   VIII  
Work in S.W.
Project Director:  Charlie Hicks
Department: Industry
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Work in S.W. & Barley
Project Director:  Pete Forster
Department: Industry
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Work in W.W.
Project Director:  Charlie Hicks
Department: Industry
Center: SAREC
Source: SARRA
Status: Active
Writing Emerging Science to Engage Resource Navigators: Results from State and National Surveys
Project Director:  K. Gunther
Year: 2016
Department: Ecosystem Science and Management
Center: Offstation
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   IX:2, 4, 5  
Wyoming Fresh Herb Production Completion Report
Project Director:  C. Seals
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Wyoming production of locally bred winter pea to integrate crop and livestock production
Project Director:  Anowar Islam
Year: 2015
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2, 3, 5, 6, 9,   II:7, 9  
Wyoming production of locally-bred winter pea to integrate crop and livestock production in Wyoming
Project Director:  Anowarul M. Islam
Department: Plant Sciences
Source: NIFA
Status: Active

GOAL: This project is to evaluate the performance of a new winter wheat-winter pea (WW-WP) rotation, using new genetically improved Wyoming-bred winter feed pea lines, in comparison with traditional winter wheat-summer fallow (WW-SF). This will be accomplished over three years on three producer/cooperator farms (in Platte and Laramie Counties) and one University of Wyoming Research and Extension Center (SAREC, in Goshen County).OBJECTIVE 1: Evaluate winter wheat yield in both rotations (WW-SF and WW-WP).OBJECTIVE 2: Evaluate winter pea yield, for both forage and seed, in the WW-WP rotation.OBJECTIVE 3: Evaluate soil water content at critical points in both rotations, especially at planting, flowering, and harvest.OBJECTIVE 4: Widely disseminate research results to Wyoming agriculture producers on a timely basis.

Wyoming Restoration Challenge Focuses on Restoring Weed-Infested Pastures
Project Director:  B. A. Mealor
Year: 2016
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: SAREC
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   III:3, 5, 7,   VI:3, 4,   IX:2, 3, 4, 5,   XII:1  
Yield and Stomatal Conductance Response of Experimental Dry Bean Genotypes to Drought under Greenhouse Conditions
Project Director:  Jim Heitholt
Year: 2017
Department: Plant Sciences
Center: Laramie
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
Yield Response of Confection Sunflower to Delaying the Onset of Irrigation
Project Director:  V.R. Joshi
Year: 2015
Center: Powell
Source: Field Days Bulletin
Status: Active
PARP:   I:2,   IV:4  
first previous next last