Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station

UW biomechanics research draws scientist early career award

Jay Gatlin, left, during his nomination at the annual Agricultural Experiment Station awards banquet

Jay Gatlin, left, during his nomination at the annual Agricultural Experiment Station awards banquet

Work in the biomechanics of cell division and the cell biology of cancer has earned a Department of Molecular Biology scientist the Early Career Achievement Award from the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station (AES) at the University of Wyoming.

Assistant professor Jay Gatlin in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources received the honor Feb. 12 during the AES honors banquet in Laramie.

“Jay Gatlin’s research accomplishments are absolutely amazing for a scientist at this stage of his career,” said Bret Hess, associate dean of research in the college and AES director. “Having received a perfect score on a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant and publishing results of his research from UW in Science are testaments to the quality of hiswork. The college is blessed to have a scientist of Jay’s caliber.”

University of Wyoming president Dick McGinity spoke to the audience and acknowledged the importance of the land-grant university’s mission of boosting the state’s economy and the general well-being of its citizens.

Gatlin joined UW in 2010. In 2012, Gatlin receive two NIH grants totaling more than $1.6 million. In 2013, he received a research award from the Marine Biological Laboratory. The grant paid for Gatlin and doctoral student James Hazel to conduct research at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute laboratories in Massachusetts. Last November, Gatlin and his laboratory published a paper in Science – the most prestigious scientific journal in the United States.

“Although these remarkable accomplishments should command the utmost respect, Jay doesn’t let them influence his attitude and demeanor,” said Hess. “He is the same kind, likable person everyone has come to know.”

Other award nominees were Anowar Islam and Urszula Norton, who are assistant professors in the Department of Plant Sciences.

Category: AES Centers